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Gary Woodland takes PGA lead with six-under 64

AP, Kyodo

Kansas-bred Gary Woodland felt right at home in enemy territory and delivered his best performance in a major Thursday at the PGA Championship.

Woodland used his power to birdie the two par 5s on the soft turf of Bellerive, and he relied on a new grip and new confidence in his putter for everything else on his way to a 6-under 64 for a one-shot lead over Rickie Fowler in the opening round of the year’s final major.

Woodland recognized close to 100 friends and family among thousands in a gallery that withstood the sweltering weather, and his only fault was trying too hard. He made a careless bogey on the opening hole, had to make a 15-foot par putt at No. 5. And then he settled down and was on his way.

“This week is as close to home as I’ve been,” Woodland said. “I snuck over here about a month ago and played the golf course. Really enjoyed the layout. The turf is very familiar to me. It’s so hot here during the summer, so the greens are soft and slow. You can be more aggressive, which suits my game.”

Fowler played in the morning, when the greens were slight smoother, and made five birdies over his last 11 holes for a 65. It was an important start for Fowler, who turns 30 this year and already is regarded as among the best without a major. The closest he has come to such a trophy is celebrating those won by his friends.

“It’s not something I necessarily worry about,” Fowler said. “Keep putting ourselves in position, get in contention . . . we have had plenty of runner-ups. Jack (Nicklaus) had a lot of runner-ups. We’ll just keep beating down that door.”

Bellerive allowed for low scoring, provided the ball stayed in the short grass. Woodland had an 18-foot birdie attempt on the 18th hole that would have tied the PGA Championship record, and it stopped just short. It was one of the few he missed.

Two-time major champion Zach Johnson and Brandon Stone of South Africa were at 66.

It was more of a struggle for Tiger Woods, drenched in so much sweat that he changed shirts after 12 shots — that was only two holes and a tee shot. He had to make an 8-foot putt to escape with bogey on No. 10, and then dumped a wedge into the water for double bogey on No. 11. Woods was 3 over through seven holes, and then clawed his way back to even par for a 70.

“A lot of things could happen. Not a lot them were positive,” Woods said. “But I hung in there and turned it around.”

Hideki Matsuyama and Yuta Ikeda both carded 68s and are four shots off the pace.

“I think it was a good score, considering it was the opening day of a major tournament. I think I did a good job pulling myself together,” Matsuyama said. “I’ll start thinking about the tournament if I can get a good score in my second round.”

Defending champion Justin Thomas let a good start slip away. He didn’t make a putt outside a few feet over the last 12 holes and shot 69.