Osaka Hanten

Review excerpt: Hasao Tanaka, at Osaka Hanten, charges only ¥200 for a bowl of ramen, but knows it has to be of the highest quality, otherwise his customers would never come back for a second serving.

Nihonryori RyuGin Hibiya

Review excerpt: RyuGin 2.0 represents a major upgrade. At last, chef Yamamoto has a setting worthy of his culinary status, and of the well-heeled clientele who will favor this more salubrious and central location.

Lature

Review excerpt: At both lunch and dinner, wild food remains front and center on the menu at Lature. The chef's signature starter is a delicate savory macaron made with the blood of the same Yezo sika deer he serves as a main course.

Wana Tedome

Review excerpt: Wana Tedome doesn’t mess with any ordinary meat. “Deer, not cow. Boar, not pig,” the illuminated street-level sign outside proclaims in Japanese. “Grilled venison, grilled boar and grilled pheasant.”

A Peu Pres

Review excerpt: A Peu Pres has a whimsical easygoing charm. And chef Mizuho Takemura’s take on French food is wholesome, without fanfare or drama.

Yuu

Review excerpt: Whether you order a la carte or choose one of the set menus at Yuu, you'll be treated to traditional washoku cuisine in a modest and modern restaurant.

Ibrew Shinbashi

Reivew excerpt: Ibrew’s craft beer pub has only been open there for a year, but its no-frills, low-budget approach makes it a perfect fit for commuters.

Toridoki

Review excerpt: At lunch, Toridoki morphs from its role as neighborhood izakaya tavern to offer hearty, good-value set meals. It also serves a parallel menu of udon noodles made in the chunky Sanuki style.

Vaner

Review excerpt: Vaner is Tokyo’s first (and right now the only) bakery specializing in traditional Norwegian-style whole-wheat bread.