Review excerpt: Sobagami is a soba noodle specialist, but it is also an offshoot of the very genteel Ginza Kamiya, a high-end kappō that takes pride in doing things the right way.

Review excerpt: Soba purists visiting Imose might want to go with either inaka soba (a dark variety) or the jūwari soba (made with 100-percent soba flour).

Review excerpt: The standard ¥1,460 zaru-soba set (cold soba served on a basket accompanied with a dipping sauce) at Soba Dokoro Sasaki becomes a hearty meal with extra toppings such as tempura prawn, eggplant and perilla, as well as sides including pickled radish and ...

Review excerpt: The noodles at Udon Taira are served in a steaming-hot clear dashi broth, topped with morsels of burdock root deep-fried in thick tempura batter. If that sounds too plain, ask for wakame gobo-ten, which comes with a generous amount of jade-green seaweed, ...

Review excerpt: When visiting Atariya for lunch it’s worth it to try and beat the afternoon rush to secure one of the tenshin lunches — there are only 10 served each day, and it’s first come, first served. As soba lunch sets go, it’s ...

Muraki serves black and white buckwheat noodles, which are both made early each morning with flour from Hokkaido and Fukui prefectures. The “black” soba is black in name only, these noodles are juwari, made from 100 percent buckwheat giving them a more robust character ...

What makes Matsubara-an so popular — in both Harajuku and Kamakura — is the extensive menu of side dishes to delve into before your noodles arrive. Traditionalists will be happy to find classic sobaya (soba shop) snacks, from sashimi and chilled tofu to itawasa ...

Each serving (¥950) includes five or six different kinds of soba. Some are fine and delicate, others chunkier, and several contain other ingredients, such as poppy seed or aoba (green perilla leaf) or lemon zest. Kasamuta arranges small portions of them in a hollowed-out ...

At Sobaya Nicolas, a portentous Michelin-starred soba (buckwheat noodle) restaurant in the north of Kyoto, it’s impossible not to notice the signs — written in Japanese and English — forbidding photography. Unfortunately, this creates an atmosphere not unlike that of a museum, and to ...

It’s hard to believe you are just steps away from the brashness of Shibuya’s Center-Gai. You have come to eat soba noodles, but it feels more like entering a ceremonial tea house. Once inside, stairs lead down to beautifully spot-lit dining room, where you ...

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