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Despite ongoing peace negotiations between the United States and the Taliban, the bloody conflict in Afghanistan continues to take a heavy toll on the country’s people. The recent suicide bombing by the Khorasan branch of the Islamic State (IS-K) at a wedding in Kabul, which killed more than 60 and injured close to 200, is a stark reminder of Afghanistan’s poor security situation. It also shows that the Taliban are not the only armed opposition fueling the conflict. A U.S.-Taliban peace pact is therefore unlikely to bring any respite.

The U.S.-Taliban negotiations in Doha — in which the Afghan government is not a participant — are comparable to two previous peace processes: the Paris talks that resulted in the January 1973 peace treaty between the U.S. and North Vietnam; and the negotiations that led to the 1988 Geneva Accords, signed by the Afghan and Pakistani governments with the Soviet Union and the U.S. acting as guarantors.

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