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PRINCETON, New Jersey — The celebrations to mark the 50th anniversary of the Treaty of Rome come at an opportune moment. For now is the time for the European Union to call an end to its self-imposed “reflection period” following the rejection of the European Constitution by the French and the Dutch, and to restart the unification process that began in Rome 50 years ago.

The reflection period has been utterly devoid of actual reflection, and Europe’s leaders have failed to offer Europe’s citizens any new, fundamental vision. So how should a “refounding” (Neubegrundung) of Europe — as called for by German Chancellor Angela Merkel in her first parliamentary statement on European policy — be accomplished?

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