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Distributing handouts is an unusual way for executives to communicate with employees in the 21st century. The messages on some of Fuji Corp.’s materials were even more retrograde. One featured a screenshot from a nationalistic YouTube video with comments below, including one that read "Die Zainichi,” a reference to second- and third-generation Koreans living in Japan. Several of the documents referred to Korean "comfort women" — women who suffered under Japan’s military brothel system before and during World War II — as "whores.”

One employee in particular, a third-generation Zainichi whose name has been withheld by Bloomberg and other media over concerns about future harassment, grew increasingly uncomfortable. She asked the Osaka home-builder to stop the leafleting. It didn’t and, in 2015, she sued.

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