• Kyodo

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Monday

  • Most companies, government offices to have first working day of 2021.
  • Tokyo Stock Exchange to have first trading session of 2021. The benchmark Nikkei ended 2020 at its highest year-end close since 1989 despite the economic fallout from the coronavirus pandemic. Analysts expect the rally to continue on progress in global COVID-19 vaccinations.
  • Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga to hold first news conference of 2021. Suga is expected to express his intention to prevent the further spread of the virus while sustaining economic growth with stimulus measures. He is also likely to reiterate Japan’s determination to hold the postponed Tokyo Olympics and Paralympics this summer.
  • J. League’s Levain Cup final between Kashiwa Reysol and FC Tokyo to be held at National Stadium in Tokyo. The league rescheduled the match, originally slated for November, after several Kashiwa players tested positive for the novel coronavirus.

Tuesday

  • Japan Automobile Dealers Association to release data on new motor vehicle sales for December and all of 2020.
  • Tokyo’s Toyosu market to hold first auctions of 2021. Its tuna auctions draw attention every year for astonishing prices. A bluefin tuna fetched ¥193 million last year, the second-highest price on record following ¥333 million in the previous year.

Wednesday

  • Cabinet Office to release consumer sentiment data for December.

Thursday

  • Campaigning to start for gubernatorial elections in Yamagata and Gifu prefectures.

Friday

  • Ministry of Internal Affairs and Communications to release household spending data for November.
  • Cabinet Office to release preliminary composite indexes of economic indicators for November. The data suggested an improvement in economic activity over the five months through October. The focus is on whether the recent resurgence of the coronavirus has hurt the recovery from the initial impact of the pandemic.

Sunday

  • 15-day New Year Grand Sumo Tournament to start at Tokyo’s Ryogoku Kokugikan.

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