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100 YEARS AGO

Friday, Aug. 20, 1920

Women may attend political meetings

1920 | THE JAPAN TIMES
1920 | THE JAPAN TIMES

The authorities have decided to abolish the police regulation forbidding women to attend political public meetings.

It will be remembered that the women’s leaders did their best during the recent session of the Diet to secure the abolition of regulations against them.

The authorities have held repeated conferences on the question and have at last made up their minds to abolish the regulation above mentioned, but not that which forbids women to participate in any public demonstration of a political nature.

The announced reform will be reported at general meeting of the New Women’s Association to be held on Sunday next.


75 YEARS AGO

Thursday, Aug. 9, 1945

New-type bombs used in raid on Hiroshima

1945 | THE JAPAN TIMES
1945 | THE JAPAN TIMES

President Truman’s announcement on Monday that American aircraft had dropped a new-type bomb in an attack on the Japanese mainland was bitterly criticised by the Vatican spokesman who said that the news created a “painful impression” in the Holy See says a Reuters newscast received in Stockholm. The new bomb is regarded as a further step in the direction of indiscriminate employment of means of destruction, the spokesman said.

New-type bombs were used by the small number of superforts that raided Hiroshima on Monday morning, causing considerable damage to the city quarters, the Imperial Headquarters announced, in its communique issued at 3:30 p.m. Tuesday.

The communique follows:

“1. In the attack made by a small number of B-29’s on August 6, considerable damage was caused to Hiroshima City.

“2. In this attack, the enemy used new-type bombs. Details are now under investigation.”


50 YEARS AGO

Wednesday, Aug. 19, 1970

MPD surveys Shinjuku in hippie head count

1970 | THE JAPAN TIMES
1970 | THE JAPAN TIMES

Shinjuku’s foreigners’ hippie colony was inhabited by 65 persons from 65 countries, according to a recent survey by the Metropolitan Police Department.

According to the survey conducted in late July, the colony’s population was 27 Americans (2 females); 8 British (1 female); 8 French (1 female); 6 Canadians (1 female); 3 Germans; 3 Swedes; 3 Swiss; 1 Argentine and 1 Malaysian.

About two-thirds of them had tourist visas which are valid for two months before a renewal is required. Some have lived here for more than six months, having renewed their visas twice.

Thirty-two of them were students. There were also teachers, company employees, artists and soldiers.

More than half of them came directly to Shinjuku upon arrival at Tokyo International Airport, having heard from others of a hotel in Shinjuku where opportunities could be found.

Twenty-four stayed at the hotel located at Shinjuku 4-chome where the overnight charge is ¥300.

They earned money teaching conversation in English and other foreign languages in the daytime and gathered near the east entrance of the JNR Shinjuku Station at night for fun.

Among them was an American youth, 27, arrested in the act of puffing a marihuana [sic] cigarette in his room at the hotel.


25 YEARS AGO

Wednesday, Aug. 16, 1995

Apology issued for war: Murayama cites mistaken national policy

1995 | THE JAPAN TIMES
1995 | THE JAPAN TIMES

Prime Minister Tomiichi Murayama, in a statement released Tuesday to mark the 50th anniversary of the war’s end, offered a straightforward apology and expression of remorse for the nation’s actions before and during World War II.

He acknowledged the damage and suffering inflicted upon other Asian countries by Japan’s colonial rule and aggression, calling it the result of a mistaken national policy.

However, Murayama said all matters concerning Japan’s wartime redress have been legally solved through a series of international treaties, and the government will not compensate individuals, including former “comfort women.”

Nevertheless, he said his government would continue to address postwar issues with sincerity.

In the statement, which was approved by the Cabinet, the prime minister thanked the United State and other nations for their support and aid in the postwar reconstruction.

He said the lessons of war must be passed on so the next generation will not repeat the errors in Japan’s history.

“During a certain period in the not-too-distant past, Japan, following a mistaken national policy, advanced along the road to war, only to ensnare the Japanese people in a fateful crisis, and, through its colonial rule and aggression, caused tremendous damage and suffering to the people of many countries, particularly those of Asian nations,” Murayama said.

“I regard, in a spirit of humility, these irrefutable facts of history, and express here once again my feelings of deep remorse and state my heartfelt apology,” he continued.

“Japan must eliminate self-righteous nationalism, promote international coordination as a responsible member of the international community and, thereby, advance the principles of peace and democracy,” Murayama said. “At this time of remembrance, I declare to people of Japan and abroad my intention to make good faith the foundation of our government policy, and this is my vow.”

During a news conference after he read the statement, Murayama did not say specifically what policy had been a mistake, stressing that the point is to recognize that Japan inflicted great suffering and damage to the people of many nations, especially in Asia.

He said that the late Emperor Showa bears no war responsibility.

Compiled by Leo Howard. In this feature, we delve into The Japan Times’ 124-year archive to present a selection of stories from the past. The Japan Times’ archive is now available in digital format. For more details, see jtimes.jp/de.

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