History | JAPAN TIMES GONE BY

Japan Times 1920: Cholera comes to the capital

100 YEARS AGO

Wednesday, July 7, 1920

Cholera makes first appearance in Tokyo

1920 | THE JAPAN TIMES
1920 | THE JAPAN TIMES

Although cholera made its appearance in South-Western Japan some time ago, Tokyo has been so far free of the epidemic. The first genuine case, however, has now occurred, the patient being an old woman of about 74 years of age, who came here a few days ago to inquire after the health of her grand child who is in one of the Tokyo hospitals.

The Health authorities have decided to inject anti-cholera serum on all boatmen as one of the preventive measures against the spread of the disease.

According to the latest returns of the Home Department, the total number of cases of cholera in Japan, since the present epidemic started, numbered 600 up to the end of last month. Insufficient knowledge of where the outbreak really originated has considerably handicapped the preventive efforts of the Health authorities, declares an official attached to the Sanitary Bureau of the Metropolitan Police. Of the 600 cases that have occurred, 60 percent have proved fatal.

75 YEARS AGO

Sunday, July 1, 1945

Japanese commander committed ‘harakiri’ after final assault, U.S. broadcast says

1945 | THE JAPAN TIMES
1945 | THE JAPAN TIMES

The heroic end of Lieutenant General Mitsuru Ushijima, Supreme Commander of the Japanese Forces in the Okinawa Area, and of Major General Isamu Cho, Chief of Staff to the Japanese Forces there, after conducting a mass attack against the main body of the enemy forces on June 20, was revealed by a San Francisco broadcast on June 27.

The broadcast said that the bodies of Lieutenant General Ushijima and Major General Cho were discovered under the tombstones standing on the southwestern coast of the main Okinawa Island and that they were both clad in their military uniforms. Apparently they committed “harakiri” and their heads were cut off by an executioner according to the prescribed form, the broadcast further said.

As was previously announced by the Imperial Headquarters, details concerning the Okinawa situation were not available, though the gallant fight waged by the Japanese Forces in their last offensive could be easily imagined. As was revealed in Lieutenant General Ushijima’s last message to a friend, the Japanese warriors must have carried on to the last even after their ammunition had been exhausted and their swords broken. The report on the heroic end of the two generals released by the enemy eloquently reveals the last assault carried out by the Japanese officers and men and their death in action.

Anticipating the worst, Major General Cho wrote to his friend in Fukuoka: “My adjutant is a man of superior personality, assisting me in every way. Whatever may happen, please be assured that I am ready to meet death as a worthy Japanese warrior with the adjutant as witness.”

50 YEARS AGO

Tuesday, July 28, 1970

Tokyo flashes first poison smog warning

1970 | THE JAPAN TIMES
1970 | THE JAPAN TIMES

The Tokyo Metropolitan Government flashed its first photochemical smog warning Monday when it officially inaugurated the warning system.

A total of 391 residents in 18 wards, including Nakano, Bunkyo, Shinjuku, Shinagawa and Chiyoda and cities of Musashino and Chofu had reported to health clinics complaining of sore eyes. Among them were 15 patients and nurses at Koseinenkin Hospital in Shinjuku Ward. They were struck with gas while the windows were left open.

This was, however, the fifth consecutive day in which the warning was issued counting the warnings made in the test period.

The first official warning, under the two-stage warning system — warning and more serious “alarm” — was announced at 11:30 a.m. in western and southern parts of the central metropolis and the Saitama area in the suburbs of Tokyo.

The Tokyo Metropolitan Government said the density of oxidants, the source of the smog, began rising at 9 a.m. under the influence of the strong sun.

25 YEARS AGO

Monday, July 17, 1995

Work less important than fun

1995 | THE JAPAN TIMES
1995 | THE JAPAN TIMES

Workers in their 20s value friends and their social life more than work, according to a lifestyle survey by Fukoku Mutual Life Insurance Co.

The results of the survey, conducted on 500 men and women in the Tokyo area, show that the majority of women gave first priority to “love” and “social life.”

In contrast, 46.7 percent of men said their first priority was work. But when men were asked what they valued most, “friends” and “health” each accounted for more than 40 percent of the responses.

Fukukoku says men were probably concerned with appearances, while women were more honest about their responses.

Men said they were most concerned with conversation when they dated, while women were most concerned with dress. More than half of the men said they paid more than 60 percent of the costs of dating. More than 60 percent of women said they paid between 20 percent and 50 percent of the costs.

More than 80 percent of those surveyed said they went out drinking with their bosses even when business was not involved, because “the bosses asked them” and “the bosses paid the checks.”

Although about 40 percent said they would work overtime if they were ordered to, an equal number said they would leave the office immediately at the end of the working day. Only 15 percent said they would work late voluntarily.

Compiled by Leo Howard. In this feature, we delve into The Japan Times’ 124-year archive to present a selection of stories from the past. The Japan Times’ archive is now available in digital format. For more details, see jtimes.jp/de.

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