Food & Drink | Japan Pulse

Dominique Ansel caters to Tokyo's (semi)sweet tooth with cronuts and s'more

by Mio Yamada

Staff Writer


Dominique Ansel Bakery opens June 20, but expect extremely long queues because Ansel has brought to Japan not only his famed Cronut, but also a vast array of unusual and creative desserts.

Though Ansel has said that he’ll be toning down the sugar levels for the Japanese clientele, this is still definitely a must-do for people with a sweet tooth as we discovered on a recent press preview event.

The bakery’s celebrated Frozen S’more — huge chunks of toasted marshmallow-covered vanilla ice cream on sticks — and Cookie Shot — chocolate-lined cookie cups filled with milk — are being served alongside several Japan-only treats.

Among the exclusive items is the Paris Tokyo. Inspired by the circular metro sign and Japanese bamboo, Paris Tokyo’s small balls of vanilla cream and matcha ganache have a dab of passion-fruit jam and are sandwiched between rings of choux pastry and topped with white chocolate ginkgo leaves.

Then there’s the Maneki Neko Religieuse filled with vanilla cream and yuzu jam, and fashioned in the shape of a smiling lucky cat. If you’re looking for something a bit more mature, though, the traditional Japanese sweet-inspired Mont Blanc Wagashi is a chestnut-paste covered meringue that sits on a bed of gold leaf.

Most of the desserts may be rich and aimed at adults, but the space is for the fun-loving child in everyone. Even the bakery’s brightly lit interiors uses candy-floss colors in a mock Paris subway map that names Ansel’s creations in place of stations, while cute color-matching graphic works by Vahram Muratyan look down on customers from the staircase.

If you need a break from the sweet stuff, the second floor also serves light savory dishes, salads and drinks, and if you’re brave enough to take your kids there’s always the Mr. Roboto melon pan — it’s filled with Hokkaido milk cream, but it can’t be any worse than a regular Japanese melon pan pastry.

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