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Hokusai and the Gourmets of Great Edo

Ever since washoku (Japanese cuisine) was added to UNESCO's Intangible Cultural Heritage list in 2013, interest in this country's dining culture has continued to increase worldwide. Washoku culture flourished during the Edo Period (1603-1868) thanks to a period of economic growth that left some with ...

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Power of Ceramics: Modernism in Finnish Applied Arts

At the Paris Exposition of 1900, Finland's pavilion drew praise for its design and garnered a lot of attention, and by the mid 20th century, Finnish ceramics had become popular across the globe. This Finnish art form in particular has also been influential on ...

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Challenges From the Other Side 1960’s-80’s

Contemporary art began to diversify in terms of style after the mid-1950s, raising questions about existing systems and concepts surrounding art as a discipline. Artists began to direct their attention toward mediums that had yet to be broadly recognized — publications, for example — ...

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Seeing Through a Glass

Landscape is one of the most popular themes in art. Whether it's natural or urban settings, artists have long sought to express the world they see around them. With the theme of "landscapes" central to "Seeing Through a Glass," this collection seeks to "see through" ...

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Hyslom Temporary Human

The art performance group Hyslom comprises three contemporary artists — Itaru Kato, Fuminori Hoshino and Yuu Yoshida — and aims to explore two concepts: the lost connection between the Earth and the human body and the search for an unknown no-man's land that isn't ...

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Mingei: Another Kind of Art

In 1925, the Japanese philosopher Muneyoshi Yanagi (1889-1961) coined the term "mingei" to refer to folk arts and crafts that involved high levels of skill but were made by unknown craftspeople. Being created from local materials, made in traditional colors and involving long-established manufacturing ...

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Munch: A Retrospective

One of the most significant artists of modernism, Edvard Munch (1863-1944) portrayed aspects of the human existence — love, despair, jealousy and loneliness — while depicting the daily life and landscapes of Norway. Focusing on works from the artist's collection on loan from the Munch ...

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Redon and His World: Beyond Imagination

Though French symbolist Odilon Redon (1840-1916) was active at the same time as the impressionists, he pursued his own unique style, often depicting eerie monsters and fantastical scenes. Producing works so different to his contemporaries, Redon was believed to have kept himself aloof from other ...

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Biomatrix

Using innovative techniques that he devised himself, Kohei Nawa alters man-made materials to create works that are evocative of living organisms. The concept behind his well-known "PixCell" works is the combination of the smallest units of digital images (pixels) with the smallest unit of ...

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Beauty in the Yumeji Style

The bijinga (portraits of beautiful women) by Takehisa Yumeji (1884-1934) portrayed women in such a distinctive manner that it became known as "Yumeji beauty style." Yumeji developed this poetic and minimalist yet romantic style after meeting his wife Tamaki, but it has also been ...

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Torafu Architects, known for clever and playful architectural and industrial designs, brings together a selection of it models and products to create a diorama through which brightly colored children’s wooden blocks travel via a miniature train track. Also on display are a number of Torafu ...

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