Review excerpt: There are plenty of simple side dishes to go with the drinks but Kikuya’s main calling card is tempura, cooked to order in front of your eyes. All the standards are present, plus winter specials such as snow crab, monkfish and cod ...

Review excerpt: Tabelog, the restaurant review website, included Aitsu no Ramen Kataguruma in its top 100 ramen restaurants in West Japan for 2017. And with the award comes a wait.minutes or so.

Review excerpt: The Hangar is a sleek little sake-specialist bar-turned-restaurant that seems to exemplify Japan’s reborn enthusiasm for its national tipple, nihonshu.

Review excerpt: Rice, Japan’s staple grain, has always been accorded deep respect, and Komesan is just reworking a long Japanese tradition. But it does so in a way that is contemporary, accessible and most enjoyable.

Review excerpt: When it boils down to it, the shabu-shabu at Hyoto Kyoto is a simple affair: you, a pot of steaming broth, raw vegetables and slices of beef or pork cut as thin as pages of a newspaper.

Review excerpt: The lunchtime menu at Cafe Antique is a nod to kissaten classics: hamburger, curry rice and hayashi rice, but Iwasaki’s take is to make them less stodgy.

Review excerpt: The signature Shoyu ramen at Homemade Ramen Muginae is deep, rich, hearty, warming. The Nibora — that’s short for niboshi ramen — is lighter but equally satisfying.

Review excerpt: Soba purists visiting Imose might want to go with either inaka soba (a dark variety) or the jūwari soba (made with 100-percent soba flour).

Review excerpt: Sushi Shin offers a welcome sushi break from the maddening crowds beyond the noren; they just need to iron out a few wasabi kicks.

Review excerpt: After a selection of appetizers at Tadenoha — mostly seasonal vegetables and mushrooms that go well with sake or Kumajochu, the renowned shōchū from chef Kozuru’s home region — the dinner unfolds through half a dozen courses.

Review excerpt: The flavors are light and as bright as the turquoise plates they’re served on at Good Luck Curry, with neither the gloopy richness of Japanese-style roux-based curries nor the oil-heavy style found in northern India.

Review excerpt: Depending on the season, the meat at Tokuyamazushi, will be either grilled or cooked in bubbling, warming hot pots as the culmination of multicourse meals that are heavy with local vegetables, wild herbs, mushrooms and fruit.

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