You can't call it a bistro; the dining room looks way too chic, and the food is several notches too sophisticated. By the same measure, it's not a wine bar either, despite the prominence of the glass-fronted cellar. So is it a full-fledged restaurant? ...

Using super-fresh seasonal ingredients is a non-negotiable for any high-end chef. But Ueki, even more than most, is focusing on the vegetable kingdom, often using indigenous varieties rarely found outside of Japanese cuisine.

Shibata's one-plate special (¥1,500, served only on Saturdays, Sundays and holidays) is great value. You get to pick from seven different main dishes (meat, fish, omelet, etc.), which are served on a sizable oblong platter with cooked vegetables on the side and a hefty ...

It has an easygoing neighborhood feel, and it stays open throughout the afternoon for anyone who wants to drop in for a snack -- just as a creperie would in France, and, indeed, as a traditional sobaya would in Japan.

To find anywhere serving a good cooked breakfast at 7 in the morning is in itself noteworthy. But to sit down in such a relaxed setting -- high ceilings, mix-and-match old wooden furniture, a bar at one end and a comfy banquette at the ...

The tea canisters on the shelves of the ground-floor retail store barely hint at the sheer number of teas stocked here. There are hundreds listed in the catalog, many of them exclusive, handpicked, single-estate, first-flush varieties. All are available for you to choose from ...

The menu features plenty of charcuterie and hearty regional dishes -- quenelles (dumplings); salade Lyonnaise (with bacon and a poached egg), fromage de te^te (pork head cheese) -- presented with a delicacy and sophistication well above the norm for this kind of French soul ...

Owner-chef Toru Kawano's cooking is confident, modern, vibrant and colorful. Above all, it is intensely flavorful, just as you'd expect from a chef who has worked with some of the top names in French cuisine, from Guy Savoy and Georges Blanc to Joel Robuchon.

One thing about the menu: There isn't one; at least not on paper. As at top Japanese restaurants, you leave it up to the chef to know what foods are in season and how they are best prepared. Lunch or dinner, everyone eats the ...

Beard. What sort of name is that for a restaurant, least of all one serving French-inflected food? And what chef would have the word daubed in orange paint across his front door, on the diagonal no less? One with a quirky sense of humor, ...

Review excerpt: Kushiage, udon, kinmedai — Whatever is served at Beignet, you’re in for a treat.

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