Area:Yotsuya

Information about things to do in Japan, restaurants, films, destinations and more.

Review excerpt: Ogawa is not rooted in the old ways. Instead of following the standard izakaya (traditional tavern) mode — where customers linger all evening, drinking and ordering yakitori a few sticks at a time — it operates more like a sushi or tempura ...

Word spread fast and Ubuka soon became a favorite of chefs and others in the know. They appreciate the unpretentious setting and Kato’s unaffected style. They like that he stays open a bit later than most other restaurants. And — most of all — ...

The term "izakaya," loosely translated, means "a place where you can settle in with sake." But that glosses over the two other essential attributes: the food; and the atmosphere, the buzz, what the Irish might call the craic. Okagesan boasts all three -- sake, ...

A generation ago, this low-rise warren of alleys lined with eateries, bars and taverns was a much more tightly closed world. To penetrate beyond the noren curtains hiding those inscrutable doorways, you needed introductions or, at the very least, prior reservations. These days most places are ...

The decor is warm and welcoming, the cooking good and portions substantial. And best of all, it’s great value. This may not be the cheapest French meal in town — for that, you can just walk up the alley to Pas a Pas, with ...

Slide open the door and you will be greeted by a matron in kimono, who will direct you to a table in the modest dining room, or, should they all be taken, to a bench in the interior corridor leading back toward the kitchen ...

The food is never the main reason for going to any beer garden. And although there it does feel rather institutional at times, Sekirei has much more to choose from than fries and chicken wings.

Time and budget constraints preclude frequent flights to Hanoi or Ho Chi Minh City. But a highly acceptable alternative is just to ride the subway down to Yotsuya Sanchome, to Thien Phuoc, one of the friendliest, funkiest Vietnamese eateries in all of Tokyo.

Much more than just an eating place, Saikabo serves as an unofficial kimchi cultural center. It has a street-level retail store, where you can pick up half a dozen different kinds of kimchi as well as other staples brought in from South Korea.

Not only does Nohira serve up fare that few French people would fault, he does it with a lightness of touch and flair for presentation that would embarrass most bistros in France. He also uses an interesting selection of ingredients that is certainly above ...

Notice: Event and location information is subject to change.