Area:Omotesando

Information about things to do in Japan, restaurants, films, destinations and more.

One thing about the menu: There isn't one; at least not on paper. As at top Japanese restaurants, you leave it up to the chef to know what foods are in season and how they are best prepared. Lunch or dinner, everyone eats the ...

There is no attempt now to woo the hip crowd: At L’Effervescence, the wow factor is all on the menu. If you knew the place in that previous incarnation, you will find the decor has been toned down but the layout inside little changed: the ...

The menu is divided into four main sections: tapas and their Lebanese counterparts, mezze; a page devoted to jamon and chorizo (from the finest Iberico hogs, of course), culatello and prosciutto from Italy, plus a good choice of cheeses; main dishes, including seafood, meat ...

Beacon styles itself as an "urban chop house." What that means is a self-confident, high-end grill in the best American tradition. Swanky and polished, it exudes the reassuring, understated elegance (and, it must be said, the equivalent sticker price) of a Lincoln Continental.

"Italian cucina using Japanese ingredients": This is Kushima's philosophy, honed from his training at some of Tokyo's top ristoranti -- though interestingly, he has never felt the need to work in Italy itself.

The 3,400 yen set dinner comprises six separate courses, including two hors d'oeuvres (one hot, one cold); fish (currently pan-fried isaki); meat (roast lamb); then two separate desserts plus coffee. This must be one of the best bargains in the city.

As a concept it is simple, admirable and hugely seductive. It also makes things much easier when it comes to ordering your meal. The essential precepts of the food are Italian and, although it's intended primarily as a foil for the wine, the cooking ...

As the name implies (aburu means "to grill"), the specialty of the house is the shichirin. As soon as you sit down, one of these miniature braziers will be set in front of you. And apart from the initial appetizers -- cabbage leaves which ...

Aptly housed next door to the MoMA store in Omotesando's Gyre building, Eye of Gyre is a two-room gallery that focuses on Japanese contemporary art, including photography, installations, multimedia and design. Exhibitions are free and, more often than not, a little quirky.

Notice: Event and location information is subject to change.