Area:Kyoto

Information about things to do in Japan, restaurants, films, destinations and more.

Review excerpt: When it boils down to it, the shabu-shabu at Hyoto Kyoto is a simple affair: you, a pot of steaming broth, raw vegetables and slices of beef or pork cut as thin as pages of a newspaper.

Review excerpt: The lunchtime menu at Cafe Antique is a nod to kissaten classics: hamburger, curry rice and hayashi rice, but Iwasaki’s take is to make them less stodgy.

Review excerpt: The coffee shop Saiin Roasting Factory is about a 10-minute walk from Saiin Station, plonked right in the middle of suburbia. It’s definitely a highlight in this nondescript neighborhood.

Review excerpt: Sushi Shin offers a welcome sushi break from the maddening crowds beyond the noren; they just need to iron out a few wasabi kicks.

Review excerpt: Staying on the Everest side of the menu, there’s no shortage of noodle dishes at Taj Mahal Everest, which will probably appeal to people who like Japanese food.

Review excerpt: With a menu that stretches as long as Tsugu’s, your best option is to select dishes you recognize — or you could try pot luck, or bend the waiter’s ear.

Review excerpt: The line-up at Sumikura changes continuously, but it is usually a broad sweep of the Japanese cooking canon: sashimi, tempura and simmered vegetables.

Review excerpt: Kissaten Nasu is a traditional cafe. But it’s also a curry shop and a jazz cafe, and the master might just be one of the most dapper and suave cafe owners this side of Tokyo.

Review excerpt: Kyoto's Nanaezushi is a little treasure, an authentic holdover from a time when sushi was neither an expensive fetish nor a gimmick but instead a quotidian delicacy made by specialists.

Notice: Event and location information is subject to change.