Sep 1, 2015

Colombia collecting bulk data without warrants: report

Intelligence agencies in Colombia have been building robust tools to automatically collect vast amounts of data without judicial warrants and in defiance of a pledge to better protect privacy following a series of domestic spying scandals, according to a new report by Privacy International. ...

Aug 29, 2015

Court reverses ruling that found NSA program illegal

A federal appeals court on Friday ruled in favor of the Obama administration in a dispute over the National Security Agency’s bulk collection of telephone data on hundreds of millions of Americans. The U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit reversed ...

Aug 19, 2015

Key Hong Kong pro-democracy students charged after Occupy protests

Two key figures in Hong Kong’s pro-democracy movement have been charged with illegal assembly almost a year after students stormed government headquarters at the height of huge protests against Chinese rule, one of the activists said on Wednesday. Alex Chow, 25, the former leader ...

German spy chief thanks Snowden for raising counter-espionage awareness

Jul 22, 2015

German spy chief thanks Snowden for raising counter-espionage awareness

Germany’s domestic intelligence chief said Tuesday that the revelations by Edward Snowden have had at least one positive effect, by raising awareness about the importance of counter-espionage. Hans-Georg Maassen told a gathering of business leaders in the southwestern city of Stuttgart that after the ...

Jun 14, 2015

Britain pulls out spies as Russia, China crack Snowden files: report

Britain has pulled out agents from live operations in “hostile countries” after Russia and China cracked top-secret information contained in files leaked by former U.S. National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden, the Sunday Times reported. Security service MI6, which operates overseas and is tasked ...

| Jun 4, 2015

U.S. spying under spotlight with new surveillance law

The surveillance law enacted this week stands as the most significant curb on the U.S. government’s investigative authorities since the 1970s. But it is practically inconsequential in the universe of the National Security Agency’s vast digital spying operations, a technical overhaul of a marginal ...