Dec 25, 2014

Smoking gun eludes: Who hacked Sony becomes Internet's new mystery

Everyone has a theory about who really hacked Sony Pictures Entertainment Inc. Despite President Barack Obama’s conclusion that North Korea was the culprit, the Internet’s newest game of whodunit continues. Top theories include disgruntled Sony insiders, hired hackers, other foreign governments or Internet hooligans. ...

Dec 24, 2014

Key North Korean websites suffer short outages after shutdown

Key North Korean websites suffered intermittent outages Tuesday after a nearly 10-hour shutdown that followed a U.S. vow to respond to a crippling cyberattack on Sony Pictures that Washington blames on Pyongyang. It wasn’t immediately clear what caused the Internet stoppage in one of ...

Dec 19, 2014

U.S. weighs response to Sony hacking attack blamed on North Korea

The United States was considering possible options on Thursday in response to a major cyberattack on Sony Pictures blamed on North Korea, amid calls for tougher sanctions on Pyongyang to cut it off from the global banking system. U.S. experts say options for the ...

Nov 11, 2014

Apple iOS bug makes most devices vulnerable to attack: FireEye researchers

Cybersecurity researchers have warned that a bug in Apple Inc’s iOS operating system makes most iPhones and iPads vulnerable to cyberattacks by hackers seeking access to sensitive data and control of their devices. Cybersecurity firm FireEye Inc. published details about the vulnerability on its ...

Apr 28, 2014

Japan, EU planning cybersecurity summit

With China a suspected source of cyberattacks, Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and European Union leaders will agree at a summit in Brussels on May 7 to launch a dialogue to boost cybersecurity, according to a draft of a statement to be issued after the ...

Feb 17, 2014

Waging cyberwarfare by the rules

by Stephen L. Carter

The news that a highly sophisticated malware program called Mask has spent the last six years stealing valuable intelligence from supposedly secure government and diplomatic computers around the world prompts the question: At what point does a cyberattack become an act of war?