Getting to the heart of Abe's vision for Japan's military

| May 19, 2014

Getting to the heart of Abe's vision for Japan's military

by Reiji Yoshida

The hottest buzzwords in politics these days are “the right of collective self-defense,” now that Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s advisory panel on security has released its much-awaited recommendations for reinterpreting the Constitution. The Japanese people have been engaged in heated debate as Abe works ...

Constitution revision vital: Abe adviser

May 11, 2014

Constitution revision vital: Abe adviser

by Linda Sieg

The idea that Japan can improve its security without dropping a long-standing ban on aiding friendly countries under attack is a miracle that just won’t happen, the acting head of an advisory panel to Prime Minister Shinzo Abe said. Abe has made clear that ...

May 8, 2014

SDF may get nod to supply aid in combat zones

Japan may expand the Self-Defense Forces’ scope of permitted activities abroad to include refueling and medical support for U.N.-endorsed multinational forces engaged in combat, government and ruling party sources said Wednesday. Such a major overhaul would signify a clear break from the government’s long-held ...

Military waging popularity campaign

Apr 18, 2014

Military waging popularity campaign

by Miwa Suzuki

Pacifist Japan is gradually learning to love its military, with an apparent public relations campaign to soften its image featuring online popularity contests, a much-touted soprano vocalist and dating events. The armed forces are also visible in youth culture, with young teens tuning in ...

Apr 6, 2014

SDF may acquire global reach: Ishiba

Japan could exercise the right of collective self-defense “on the other side of the globe” if national security required it, said Shigeru Ishiba, the Liberal Democratic Party’s No. 2 official. “Basically we don’t expect we will go to the other side of the globe,” ...

Feb 21, 2014

Abe guts constitutional government

People should realize that Japan's prime minister has a shallow understanding of constitutional government. Shinzo Abe thinks he is the "highest responsible person" for interpreting Japan's right to a collective self-defense, and that's dangerous.