'Best of The Best'

Jan 29, 2015

'Best of The Best'

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From its collection of around 2,500 pieces, the Bridgestone Museum’s “Best of The Best” includes works by major names such as Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Paul Cezanne and Jackson Pollock. This exhibition looks back on the museum’s 63 years before it closes on May 18 for ...

Beneath the disarray lies a struggle

Nov 6, 2014

Beneath the disarray lies a struggle

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One of the joys of covering a Willem de Kooning exhibition, such as the one at the Bridgestone Museum of Art, is catching up with the jargon that surrounds his work. As he was a leading light of New York’s postwar abstract expressionist movement, ...

'Time and the Painting: 24 Episodes'

Jul 31, 2014

'Time and the Painting: 24 Episodes'

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The Bridgestone Museum of Art has in its collection close to 160 paintings related to the concept of “time.” Like chapters of a book, there are 24 different themes in this exhibition, with works representing the eras during which the featured artists lived. It ...

A modern view of a neglected Impressionist

Dec 4, 2013

A modern view of a neglected Impressionist

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The French painter Gustave Caillebotte has suffered more than most from the fact that he wasn’t Monet, Manet, or Renoir. As one of the second-ranking Impressionists, he has long been in the shadow of these more famous names with which his career is associated. ...

'Gustave Caillebotte: Impressionist in Modern Paris'

Oct 9, 2013

'Gustave Caillebotte: Impressionist in Modern Paris'

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Despite his relatively short artistic career of two decades, the 19th-century painter Gustave Caillebotte became famous as a popular French Impressionist, alongside the likes of Claude Monet and Auguste Renoir. He became particularly well-known for fine, detailed brushwork, and usually painted scenes of upper-class ...

'Through Japanese Eyes: Paris, 1900-1945'

Mar 28, 2013

'Through Japanese Eyes: Paris, 1900-1945'

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Japan first became fascinated with Western culture after the Meiji Restoration (1868), when the country opened itself to foreign relations and trade. Keen to learn about, assimilate and reinvent cultural influences, many Japanese sought inspiration in Paris, which was then considered the art center ...