It boasts high ceilings and massive windows looking out over the Ginza rooftops. But instead of tablecloths and gleaming stemware, Slow Time dials back the formality, with plain wooden tabletops and simpler furnishings.

What other tonkatsu restaurant serves vibrant mixed salads of organically grown seasonal vegetables? Or uses sashimi-fresh kuruma-ebi (king prawns) for its ebi-fry. Or makes freshly squeezed honey-lemon soda?

Just like at Kojyu, Ginza Okuda serves only full-course omakase set meals that need to be booked ahead of time. From start to finish — and even the simplest meal here will last a couple of hours — the attention to quality and presentation ...

The tea canisters on the shelves of the ground-floor retail store barely hint at the sheer number of teas stocked here. There are hundreds listed in the catalog, many of them exclusive, handpicked, single-estate, first-flush varieties. All are available for you to choose from ...

Yes, undeniably it veers close to being a theme restaurant. But anyone who has ever traveled through the Yaeyama archipelago — especially to its spiritual heartland, Taketomi itself — is likely to feel themselves transported in a trice. Those who haven’t may find a ...

This is modern French gastronomy at its best, with precision but not pretension. All the details are right: a trolley laden with cheeses of perfect maturity; desserts of great artistry; a heavyweight wine list (with little under ¥10,000); and polished service that is never ...

Vin Picoeur describes its genre as “French barbecue” — and the centerpiece of the restaurant is the charcoal grill — but it looks and functions much like an izakaya. Think kushi-yaki and oden, but given a totally Western twist.

Is Kagari really worth queuing — a good half hour if the line is down to the corner — for a meal that will take half that time to eat? Without question.

Tokyo, of course, operates at a faster pace than the old capital, and the delicate Kyoto cuisine served at Shakunage is tailored to those demands, especially at lunchtime.

Instead of attempting some misconstrued haute cuisine version of Vietnamese cooking married to French pretensions, Ishinabe concentrates on the basic foods that are already known and loved here, but renders them with uncommon delicacy and refinement.

The idea is simple but profound. Japan’s traditional multicourse cuisine has always been based on the bounty of the vegetable kingdom. Increasingly, though, kaiseki meals have become loaded up with meat and seafood, with vegetables, herbs and mushrooms treated as mere seasonal accents. Nagamine ...

It’s a boutique bar that dispenses not wine or draft beer but shots of premium fruit vinegar.

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