It also has an excellent and eclectic menu — just as you’d expect from any spinoff of the wonderful (and rather more sophisticated) Namikibashi Nakamura in Shibuya. Naturally there’s a strong emphasis on good regional sake and shochu, plus great seasonal seafood.

The top-end menu will include some 15 separate plates, from the elaborate hassun appetizer platter to a “main” dish which, depending on the season, could be fugu pufferfish or crab in winter, ayu sweetfish during the hot months or morsels of rich wagyu beef ...

The legend has grown with the telling. Takazawa has only three tables and serves a maximum of 10 people each evening (initially it was just eight people at two tables). Working virtually solo, the chef prepares protracted banquets of complexity and flair. The experience ...

There’s no mystery as to what’s on the menu at Kamo-shabu Chikutei. Even if you didn’t know that “kamo” means “duck,” the lamps at the entrance with their stylized image of a mallard in flight give the game away.

It’s certainly not the sort of place you’d enter on a whim. And even if you did, you’d be turned away, as it’s invariably full. If you like the intricacy of high-end Japanese cuisine but in a relaxed setting, then it’s well worth picking ...

It also does several excellent varieties of poke, a salad of raw, marinated seafood and chopped vegetables. But the restaurant’s strongest point is its lively selection of daily specials that keeps it steps ahead of Tokyo’s one-trick-wonder Hawaiian joints.

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