Besides being admirably affordable — this neighborhood has long been the domain of students and low-status salarymen — the cooking is assured and the menu remarkably adventurous.

First you pick your wine from the various bottles Tanabe has assembled that week. Your food, all prepared by Kaneko and his team, will be matched with your choices. It is not quite as arbitrary as it sounds, but there’s definitely a frisson of ...

Everything on the menu is exactly as you might find at a restaurant in Lima — or at least one that takes pains to source quality ingredients and serve them with care and panache.

Owner Satoshi Ikuta is not just a pizza enthusiast, he is an Italophile to the umpteenth degree. He’s the guy with the goatee beard and tractor driver’s baseball cap whom you see toiling away in front of that fiery furnace. His passion is not, ...

The menu at Shonzui, chalked on a huge blackboard in the cheerfully cramped dining room, includes a generous charcuterie platter built around homemade pates and terrines, stick-to-your-ribs cassoulet and massive wagyu steaks as thick as phone directories. Needless to say, red is the predominant ...

Oysters this fresh need absolutely no further ornamentation. But lightly cooked — baked or deep-fried — they are every bit as good. What can beat classic oysters Rockefeller or fried oysters with a simple tartar sauce? Well, try them with Hisio’s patent Chinese black ...

Owner-chef Hiroshi Nakajima is a man who likes to cook for people who like to eat — especially those who appreciate the subtleties of orthodox French cuisine.

It’s a small, tidy place in southern European style — whitewashed walls, wood panels, beams across the ceiling and simple but comfortable furniture. The bistro look is apt, since Manuel serves the kind of home cooking that would not be out of place on ...

There are those who make regular pilgrimages here expressly to revisit the antipasti misti. The primi piatti are also seriously good, especially their own hand-crafted pasta. The potato gnocchi (with a sauce, perhaps, of broccoli and homemade sausage) are not to be missed.

For such a modest setting, they offer a remarkable number of wines: 50 different kinds, mostly French but with the New World also well represented — none of them priced over 5,000 yen and the cheapest a mere 1,600 yen for the bottle.

Bread and wine: what a great combination. We cannot live on either alone, but put the two together — along with an easygoing attitude and a tasty side menu of home-cooked snacks — and that’s the recipe that makes Ahiru Store one of our ...

Matching grilled skewers of chicken with wine is by no means unique, but here it’s done particularly well, and with some novel flourishes as well.

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