While the main focus is on quality sake from noted kura around the country, it also purveys shochu and wine — and a good selection of foods that fit each category of booze.

The food is based around simple, traditional fare — yakitori; beef tongue grilled over shichirin burners; pork shabu-shabu; simple nabe hotpots; plenty of vegetable dishes — but all produced using ingredients of unimpeachable quality from rural Kyushu.

Her approach rests firmly on the common-sense principles of Japanese home cooking, featuring plenty of fresh vegetables (organic where possible) and fish in season. But she incorporates the ingredients and inspiration from Okinawa and further afield. Simple in conception, delicate in execution, she melds ...

Besides its repertoire of izakaya standards, Shinpachi has established a name on the strength of its seafood, much of which is trucked in from ports in Toyama Prefecture on the Sea of Japan. On any given day, there are likely to be dozen different ...

An entire section of the menu here is devoted to dishes featuring negi in all its many shapes and forms, prepared in virtually every way known to Japanese cuisine.

Unlike the sake list, the food menu has evolved over the years, blending basic izakaya staples with numerous touches of creative flair.

n terms of genre, Kinoji occupies that uniquely Japanese culinary territory that hovers somewhere between izakaya and ryoriya. If you want to take it slowly, you can drop in for a quiet evening sipping sake, beer or stronger spirits, while exploring the a la ...

Inevitably, your eyes will be drawn to the grill pit at the far end of the kitchen — safely screened behind see-through plexiglass to avert any wayward sparks. Here, the resident grillmeister tends to his cuts of fish, chicken and vegetables. Instead of grilling ...

Once a tradesman’s store, this two-story timber-frame house has had new life breathed into it, reincarnated as an izakaya tavern. Unlike its neighbors, many of which offer boisterous carousing and entertainments of a rather more dubious nature, Tamayura is quiet, wholesome and entirely welcoming.

Besides those delicious oysters (both domestic and imported; pictured right), Bakushu-an also has a good selection of obanzai, prepared side dishes both hot and cold.

Cheerful and modern, at lunch it offers simple teishoku set meals. Then in the evening, it morphs into a bustling izakaya tavern where the hearty dishes are washed down with liberal volumes of sake, and the air fills with cigarette smoke and laughter.

The term “izakaya,” loosely translated, means “a place where you can settle in with sake.” But that glosses over the two other essential attributes: the food; and the atmosphere, the buzz, what the Irish might call the craic. Okagesan boasts all three — sake, ...

Notice: Event and location information is subject to change.