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Unfortunately torture is an all-American value

by Ted Rall

Dianne Feinstein, chairman of the Senate Intelligence Committee and long-time-until-recently National Security Agency apologist, claims to be shocked by an internal CIA report that documents the agency’s grisly record of torture after 9/11.

“The report exposes brutality that stands in stark contrast to our values as a nation,” Feinstein said April 3. “It chronicles a stain on our history that must never again be allowed to happen.”

Among the “stunning revelations” that have leaked out of the still-classified 6,600-page CIA torture report are stories that longtime followers of my writing have long been aware of, having read about them in my column during the Bush years. Guantanamo isn’t just a concentration camp; it’s also a CIA “black site”/torture dungeon, as was a joint U.S.-U.K. “extraordinary rendition” depot on the Indian Ocean island of Diego Garcia. The CIA outsourced torture to Third World sh—holes/U.S. allies, knowing/expecting/hoping that they would be murdered.

Disgusting stuff. For sure. Yet there’s something even more nauseating — and infinitely more dangerous — than a country that tortures: A nation in denial about its true values. Feinstein speaks for most Americans when she characterizes war on terror-related torture as an aberration. But she’s mistaken. Conventional wisdom is wrong. Torture is as American as red, white and blue.

Like the citizens of Nazi-occupied Europe during World War II who had a pretty good idea that those eastbound trains were a one-way ticket to hell, Americans have known since the beginning of the war on terror that their government was going to torture, was torturing and had tortured.

It is still torturing today. Yet hardly anyone complains. Five days after 9/11, on Sept. 16, 2001, Dick Cheney told Tim Russert on “Meet the Press”: “We also have to work, though, sort of the dark side, if you will. We’ve got to spend time in the shadows in the intelligence world. A lot of what needs to be done here will have to be done quietly, without any discussion, using sources and methods that are available to our intelligence agencies, if we’re going to be successful.

“That’s the world these folks operate in, and so it’s going to be vital for us to use any means at our disposal, basically, to achieve our objective.” At the time, everyone knew what that meant. The U.S. vice president speaking on behalf of the president, had announced to the world that the gloves were off, that the “quaint” Geneva Conventions were history. That the U.S. would torture.

Had Cheney’s endorsement of “brutality” been “in stark contrast to our values as a nation,” as Feinstein puts it, there would have been political blowback. Au contraire — Cheney’s siren call to the “dark side” drew mainstream political approval, even from self-identified “liberals” in the corporate media.

In October and November of 2001, Newsweek’s Jonathan Alter, Fox News’ Shepard Smith (usually the network’s calm voice of reason), and CNN’s Tucker Carlson jumped on the torture bandwagon. All three reporter-pundits called torture a necessary, lesser evil in the fight against Islamist terrorists. Carlson: “Torture is bad. Keep in mind, some things are worse. And under certain circumstances, it may be the lesser of two evils. Because some evils are pretty evil.”

“Mr. Alter said he was surprised that his column did not provoke a significant flood of email messages or letters,” reported The New York Times. “And perhaps even more surprising, he said, was that he had been approached by ‘people who might be described as being on the left whispering, I agree with you.’ ”

If torture were repugnant to Americans, Cheney — and his pet pundits like Alter — would have met with a firestorm of criticism. They would have been fired. They were not. By January 2002, the United States had defeated the Taliban and installed Hamid Karzai as the leader of a U.S. puppet regime in Afghanistan. Still, public tolerance/approval of torture continued.

A famous legal scholar, Alan Dershowitz, published an op-ed calling for the creation of “torture warrants”: “The warrant would limit the torture to nonlethal means, such as sterile needles, being inserted beneath the nails to cause excruciating pain without endangering life.” The words of a madman.

By objective standards, if the U.S. were a nation where torture stood “in stark contrast to our values,” Dershowitz would have been shouted down and ridiculed. It would be hard to imagine Harvard Law keeping such a raging nut on its payroll. But they did.

Because torture is not at against our values. Not in the least. Cheney: not forced to resign. Jonathan Alter, Shepard Smith, Tucker Carlson: all still legit, all still capable of landing big book deals and big speaking fees. They run in circles where real lefties like me — who bitched about CIA torture and kidnapping in countless cartoons and columns — are blackballed. Which makes perfect sense. Because Americans love torture. A dozen and a half years after 9/11, 68 percent of Americans still tell pollsters — even though it’s been proven ineffectual — that torture is A-OK.

A polarized nation? When it comes to anally raping young men with flashlights and broomsticks — that happened at Gitmo and the U.S.-run Bagram torture center, and may be continuing — we’re still United, We Stand.

So when newly minted President Barack Obama told Americans in 2009 that he planned to “look forward, not back”— meaning not holding anyone accountable for Bush-era torture — and visited Langley to assure nervous torturers that they could chillax, no one cared.

When government-sanctioned torture continued under Obama, no one cared.

Even when Americans rose up in 2011 to protest their government as part of the Occupy Wall Street movement, torture was less than an afterthought on activists’ menu of complaints.

Americans “progressives” don’t care either. There has never been a mass demonstration against torture.

Torture against American values? Hardly. From American troops who mutilated the genitals of Native Americans to water-boarding Filipino independence fighters in the early 20th century to organized rape gangs in Vietnam, torture has been all-American.

Ted Rall is a political cartoonist and writer (www.tedrall.com). © 2014 Ted Rall

  • Namaimo

    I think the lack of pushback against the use of torture after 9/11 was because many of us were terrified of our government. If they could torture abroad with impunity, they could also do it in the “homeland”. Nonetheless there have been demonstrations against the use of torture in front of the White House, regularly, but the MSM do not cover them, no matter how large. DemocracyNow, RT and PressTV do, if you know they exist.

    Don’t be discouraged, Ted Rall. Many of us have a conscience that rebels against torture, injustice, inequality, police brutality, homelessness, but the powers of government, in the past decade, and media devoted to distracting us from serious subjects, are such that it takes great courage to dissent.