Most restaurants still don’t get it

Regarding the March 31 article “Airports eager to cater to Muslims’ needs“: It is good to see that Japan is catering to Muslims at airports and a few other places. But as a regular visitor to Japan, I am astounded that Japan is doing nothing for the millions of global tourists who are used to enjoying tobacco-free restaurants in their own country.

In Japan, most restaurants allow people to smoke in at least some part of the restaurant. As international tourists and business people, we want to enjoy a smoke-free environment and not breathe in poisonous secondhand tobacco smoke. I am sure that restaurant employees would also enjoy a smoke-free workplace. At some point, I would expect class action by Japanese restaurant workers who have developed cancer from many years of working in a hazardous work environment.

I travel to many countries, and Japan is the only country in advanced nations that I know of that allows smoking in restaurants and in employees’ workplaces in restaurants.

There are a few smoke-free restaurants in Japan, but these are hard to find. I don’t want to risk an asthma attack from exposure to cigarette smoke.

carole goldsmith
gardenvale, australia

The opinions expressed in this letter to the editor are the writer’s own and do not necessarily reflect the policies of The Japan Times.

  • Armand Vaquer

    Japan’s restaurants have sections reserved for smokers that are closed off. While you claim that second-hand smoke causes harm, yet there is no proof of this. Smoking is a legal activity. Unless you and your gaggle of whiners make it illegal, you are probably best off staying out.