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Flu season reaches full swing in Japan

Kyodo

Flu season appears to be in full swing, with an estimated 1.64 million people across Japan coming down with the symptoms in the week through Feb. 7, the health ministry said.

Almost 6,000 day care centers and elementary and junior high schools shut down or were operating under reduced hours.

The flu season began in earnest later than in the last several years, but the number of cases is close to average, the ministry said Monday.

Flu patient data are based on reports from roughly 5,000 hospitals and other medical institutions across the country.

Of the 47 prefectures, Kanagawa had the most flu patients per medical institution from Feb. 1 to Feb. 7 at 48.95, followed by Saitama at 47.52, Aichi at 45.24, Chiba at 44.91 and Fukuoka at 44.40. The rate in Tokyo was 39.43.

The number of reported flu cases was up from the pervious week in every prefecture.

About 400,000 children aged 5 to 9 were diagnosed with the flu, making up the largest age group, followed by about 220,000 children between birth and 4 years old, and roughly 220,000 children aged 10 to 14.

The most prevalent type of flu over the last five weeks was the type-A H1N1 strain that became virulent in 2009 as a new type of flu, followed by type-B flu.

  • Voltron5150

    Perhaps, if they didn’t go to work and and spread bacteria around and instead rest at home, the spread of the flu would be prevented. Another suggestion is providing anti-bacterial hand soap, hot running water, and dryers to the public at train stations, would help prevent the sperad of bacteria and also educate the masses that washing hands is far more important than wearing a mask. Those masks look absolutely ridiculous, plus as soon as they pull down the mask with their unwashed hands to speak with someone because their voice is muffled by the mask, they’ve just defeated the purpose of wearing a mask. Educate the masses and help the public prevent the spread of diseases. All of this is common sense, which is difficult to grasp in Japan. We Japanese don’t listen to world medical expertise because we Japanese are too prideful to listen to what foreigners have to say.

  • Voltron5150

    Perhaps, if they didn’t go to work and and spread bacteria around and instead rest at home, the spread of the flu would be prevented. Another suggestion is providing anti-bacterial hand soap, hot running water, and dryers to the public at train stations, would help prevent the sperad of bacteria and also educate the masses that washing hands is far more important than wearing a mask. Those masks look absolutely ridiculous, plus as soon as they pull down the mask with their unwashed hands to speak with someone because their voice is muffled by the mask, they’ve just defeated the purpose of wearing a mask. Educate the masses and help the public prevent the spread of diseases. All of this is common sense, which is difficult to grasp in Japan. We Japanese don’t listen to world medical expertise because we Japanese are too prideful to listen to what foreigners have to say.