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Items taken from persecuted Christians return to Nagasaki in rare exhibition

by

Kyodo

More than 500 items confiscated from Japanese Christians during their brutal persecution in the 19th century from the late Edo Period to the early Meiji Era are back in Nagasaki for the first time in about 150 years.

Some 550 items are on display in the special exhibition “Miracles Protected by the Virgin Mary — Churches and Christian Sites in Nagasaki,” which runs at the Nagasaki Museum of History and Culture until April 15. They include 212 important cultural properties loaned by the Tokyo National Museum, which rarely loans so many important objects at one time.

“We made a special decision to loan them because this is a well-planned exhibition,” said Toyonobu Tani, chief curator of the Tokyo museum, which received an application for the Nagasaki Prefectural Government last June.

The exhibition is taking place because the central government has recommended that churches and other Christian locations in Nagasaki be listed as UNESCO World Cultural Heritage sites. It shows the history of Christianity in Japan from the introduction of the faith by Francis Xavier in 1549, to the birth of the “hidden Christians” caused by brutal crackdowns and the confession of their beliefs to a foreign priest by a small group of Japanese in 1865.

Satoshi Ohori, head of the Nagasaki museum, said the availability of the national treasures makes the exhibition “epoch-making” because it shows the proud history of Christianity in Japan and the highly spiritual nature of the Japanese.

Crosses, rosaries and other items on display were confiscated from Christians in the village of Urakami and never returned. A Tokyo museum official described them as “negative heritage,” and there are calls in Nagasaki for their return.

The exhibition, which includes a portrait of Xavier and Pope Gregory XII, who met four young Japanese boys sent by Christian Lord Otomo Sorin in 1585 as part of the first Japanese embassy to Europe, is thus seen as a step toward conciliation between descendants of persecuted Christians and the central government.

Members of a cultural committee formed by descendants belonging to St. Mary’s Cathedral, better known as Urakami Cathedral, in the city of Nagasaki, were invited to a private viewing of the show on Feb. 19.

“We saw proof of our ancestors’ belief,” said Katsutoshi Noguchi, one of the members. “I hope (the exhibition) will enable lots of people to share recognition that this sad history should not be repeated.”

The confession of faith by a small group of hidden Christians was seen as a miracle overseas, but the Tokugawa shogunate carried out a series of brutal crackdowns on them in Urakami.

The last and biggest of four crackdowns, triggered by the arrest of the whole village by the Nagasaki magistrate in 1867, expelled some 3,400 villagers to various parts of Japan. The crackdown also resulted in the deaths of more than 600 through torture, execution and other methods used to force people to renounce their faith.

The last crackdown aroused fierce protests from European countries, prompting the Meiji government to lift its ban on Christianity in 1873.

As Christians expelled from Urakami were supported by people in their resettled locations, there are moves to find out more about them and conduct events in appreciation of the support they were shown.

Some critics say the exhibition should have taken the views of Christians into consideration to a larger extent. But Tani of the Tokyo museum said, “In many cases, exhibitions get better while in progress,” because the displays are updated by taking visitors views into account.

Professor Kenji Yoshida at the National Museum of Ethnology praised the exhibition and the Tokyo museum’s decision. The Tokyo museum and Christians should “carefully develop their new relationship through cultural properties and creatively inherit the past,” he said.

  • Jud Mag

    The Urakami Christians cite three holocausts: the first in the early 16th century, the second in 1867 and the third in 1945. And yet, the community is still alive which attests to not only the perseverance but also the family traditions of the faithful there.

  • マルティネス ぺぺ

    “this sad history should not be repeated”, yeah, tell that to all the native Mexicans and the natives from Central and South America tortured and murdered by Christians…

  • マルティネス ぺぺ

    I understand your point and I’m sorry if my commentary affected you in someway. I have many Christian friends and believe me when I tell you I didn’t write that because of my anti-Christian sentiments. But the truth is that if they weren’t killed before, they would have ended up killing and destroying shinto and Buddhist temples and this article would have been about Japanese pagans murdered by Christians. Which is kind of ironic. But I respect your beliefs and it is good that there is no conflict between your heritage and beliefs.