Online fashion service for men

by Satoshi Toi

Kyodo

While professional stylists might be considered the preserve of movie stars and other celebrities, ordinary men seeking direction with their fashion choices can find help in a new online service.

Green romp Ltd. is running an Internet site called bemool where professional fashion stylists propose, select and buy clothing for male customers with few clues about fashion.

A user first sends in such information as his height, weight, clothing sizes, and on what occasion he plans to wear the clothing, along with his profile photo.

A female stylist will then send him a text message asking for more details about his preferences, such as what colors he likes, and selects an outfit she believes is most suitable for him, before going shopping on his behalf.

A user can ask for an entire wardrobe from hat to shoes for ¥30,000 or more, including commission fees.

The products generally arrive about two weeks after he places an order.

In September, Akira Terao, 30, a company official in Tokyo, ordered an outfit to wear to a friend’s wedding party.

A fashion adviser from bemool sent him a navy blue jacket, a pair of white pants, blue shirts and a polka dot tie.

His friends said the outfit made him look like a fashion model.

“I didn’t expect that much, but reactions from my friends were greater than expected,” Terao said.

“I was impressed as the professional stylist selected a combination of colors I would never be able to choose myself.”

Since the launch of the service in July 2012, Tokyo-based Green romp has received about 1,000 orders, mainly from men in their 30s to 40s looking to dress for a wide range of occasions, from dating and the first day at a new job to wakes and weddings.

“The service has become so popular because it is not just a purchase of clothing on behalf of customers, but a proposal of fashion styling by a professional,” said President Takahiro Noda.

Noting that fast-fashion brands are booming and fashionable clothes are available for low prices, Noda said people are all the more “desperate for advice from professionals.”