Jan 25, 2009

Can farmers keep tuna on the menu?

by Hillel Wright

In December 2007, the Fisheries Laboratory fish farm of Kinki University in Wakayama Prefecture became the first facility in the world to “close the cycle” by breeding Pacific bluefin tuna (hon-maguro) from completely cultured sources. That is, a third generation of fish was bred ...

| Jan 18, 2009

The Imperials are well connected

by Edan Corkill

The posting of Queen Elizabeth II’s Christmas Message on YouTube last year made news around the world. Less well known is the fact that Japan’s Imperial family has been offering videos among other entertaining content on their Web site for the last five years. ...

ONE for ALL

Dec 28, 2008

ONE for ALL

by Tomoko Otake

Ekiden is Japan’s homegrown long-distance road-relay event. Its popularity peak comes at the start of every year with the grueling two-day Hakone Ekiden — but some long to see it one day gracing the Olympics, too. In a few days, a new year will ...

Facts about the Hakone Ekiden

Dec 28, 2008

Facts about the Hakone Ekiden

Starting times: Jan. 2 at 8 a.m. (Tokyo to Hakone); Jan. 3 at 8 a.m. (Hakone to Tokyo) The runners: 20 all-male college track and field teams from the Kanto region (around Tokyo), each with 10 runners. How to participate: Teams that finish in ...

Ekiden pulls them in from around the world

Dec 28, 2008

Ekiden pulls them in from around the world

by Eriko Arita

Foreign athletes have been conspicuous in numerous ekiden long-distance relays since the 1980s. In the 65th Hakone Ekiden in 1989, Joseph Otwori, a Kenyan student at Yamanashi Gakuin University, and the first foreign runner in the race, overtook seven runners in the second leg, ...

Tongue-twisting over Beaujolais

| Dec 21, 2008

Tongue-twisting over Beaujolais

by Eriko Arita

On Friday, Nov. 21, the day after the worldwide release of this year’s Beaujolais Nouveau in France, I joined a gathering of some 100 wine-lovers in Tokyo’s Odaiba waterfront district to welcome the new, jet-lagged plonk to these shores. However, our meeting point was ...

30 Days in the Wilderness

| Dec 21, 2008

30 Days in the Wilderness

What miracles will the incoming 44th President of the United States perform? With 30 Days in the Wilderness (some call it the Bush) to go before the inauguration on Jan. 20, Timeout asked some of the JT’s finest to share what they hope for, ...

Mystery shrouds the ancient Oshoro circle

Dec 14, 2008

Mystery shrouds the ancient Oshoro circle

by Michael Hoffman

In 1861 at Oshoro, southwestern Hokkaido, a party of herring fishermen, migrants from Honshu, were laying the foundation for a fishing port when they saw taking shape beneath their shovels a mysterious spectacle — a broad circular arrangement of large rocks, strikingly symmetrical, evidently ...

Dec 14, 2008

Progress, and war, arrive

by Michael Hoffman

Terrified of death, having inflicted it on many, the Chinese ruler Qin Shi Huang (259-210 B.C.) sent his court sage, Xu Fu, across the eastern seas in quest of the elixir of eternal life. Xu Fu’s 60 ships, carrying (says one version) 3,000 virgin ...

Dec 14, 2008

Stone Age Japan

by Michael Hoffman

This story spans 10,000 years, yet presents few recognizable individuals. Here’s one: “The earliest known Jomon man,” writes J. Edward Kidder Jr. in “The Cambridge History of Japan,” “was uncovered in 1949 below a shell layer in the Hirasaka shell mound in Yokohama City. ...