| Dec 23, 2001

An o-tososan a year keeps the doc away

by John Gauntner

It’s a rare occasion or ceremony that does not include some sake in Japan, and that harbinger of renewal, New Year’s Day, is no exception. Although sake figures prominently in o-shogatsu celebrations from morning to night, opening the year with a prayer for health ...

| Nov 11, 2001

How mold grew to be so unique

by John Gauntner

There are two things that make nihonshu unique among the world’s alcoholic beverages. One is the process known as heiko fukuhakko, or multiple parallel fermentation. In short, this means that saccharification and fermentation take place simultaneously in the same vat, as opposed to sequentially, ...

| Sep 30, 2001

Kame no O dreamin'

by John Gauntner

Kame no O is a sake rice that has recently become popular with a number of brewers around the country. While it may not lead to the elegant, refined and lively fragrances and flavors derived from that most hallowed (yawn) of sake rices, Yamada ...

| Aug 19, 2001

The little brewery that wouldn't die

by John Gauntner

Since time immemorial sake has been brewed only in the winter. But in the last 40 years or so a handful of the nation’s breweries pioneered shiki jozo (year-round brewing), cranking out sake in large, climate-controlled factories. For various reasons, only the largest breweries ...