Keiichi Hara's new animation honors Hokusai's daughter

May 20, 2015

Keiichi Hara's new animation honors Hokusai's daughter

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Ukiyo-e master Katsushika Hokusai is one of Japan’s best-known artists. His print “The Great Wave off Kanagawa,” with its giant blue wave curling over a tiny Mount Fuji, is seen on T-shirts and coffee mugs around the world. Given his multifarious talent, vast energy ...

The honeymoon phase of Japan and the West

Apr 14, 2015

The honeymoon phase of Japan and the West

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Often, when two cultures meet, it can be very messy and lead to a lot of unpleasantness. The continuing inability of the West and Islam to understand each other suggests itself as a convenient example. This kind of conflict often boils down to a ...

'Kawaii: Cute Girls in Ukiyo-e'

Feb 19, 2015

'Kawaii: Cute Girls in Ukiyo-e'

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March 1-26 Girl’s fashion in Tokyo’s Harajuku district has become a notable symbol of contemporary Japanese kawaii (cute) culture. However, it may come as a surprise to find out that the roots of kawaii trends are far older. On show at Ukiyo-e Ota Memorial ...

'Ukiyo-e New Years Exhibition'

Dec 25, 2014

'Ukiyo-e New Years Exhibition'

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Ukiyo-e Ota Memorial Museum of Art will exhibit paintings from its collection, including works by Keisai Eisen (1790-1848), Utagawa Kunisada (1786-1865) and Utagawa Hiroshige (1797-1858). These late-Edo Period artists painted masterpieces depicting beautiful women and landscapes of the era. Many of the selected works ...

'Whistler Retrospective'

Dec 4, 2014

'Whistler Retrospective'

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The Yokohama Museum of Art commemorates its 25th anniversary with this retrospective of James Abbott McNeill Whistler (1834-1903). Whistler was one of the pioneers of Japonism, taking inspiration from ukiyo-e prints and paintings, as well as from the traditional crafts of Japan. The flattened ...

How Japan's art inspired the West

Aug 14, 2014

How Japan's art inspired the West

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In the decades after Japan was forcibly opened to large-scale international trade in the early 1850s, a fever spread across Europe for items from the exotic country: its textiles, ceramics, paper fans, woodblock prints and more. Meanwhile, the term “Japonism” was coined to describe ...