Topics

Yokohama Triennale 2014: Remembering the forgotten

Jul 31, 2014

Yokohama Triennale 2014: Remembering the forgotten

by Masami Ito

Noise. Speed. Words. Images. We live in a digital era, constantly exposed to a massive stream of information, which we believe is vital to our daily lives. Turn on the television and commentators warn us of the threats in the world. Turn on the ...

No words can describe Tan's 'Terminology'

Jul 31, 2014

No words can describe Tan's 'Terminology'

by John L. Tran

"As a visual artist it's very important to reach a point where I'm going beyond words. In interviews I find myself struggling, because we're always talking around (the work), circumscribing it. A question that I hate is 'what does this work mean?'" Fiona Tan

Lacquerware's overseas journey into the arts

Jul 31, 2014

Lacquerware's overseas journey into the arts

by Matthew Larking

Rejuvenating the traditional lacquer industry was done by emulating international exposition models, and they sold well. At the 1873 Vienna International Exhibition, lacquer by Zeshin Shibata and Taishin Ikeda received progress medals.

It's time to wise up to academic art

Jul 24, 2014

It's time to wise up to academic art

by C.B. Liddell

For too long the fine academic art of the 19th-century has lingered in the shadow of the Impressionist movement. The French Academy, with its rules and standards, has often been cast as the villain in the story of the period, standing in opposition to ...

Balthus' renaissance of Realism

Jul 24, 2014

Balthus' renaissance of Realism

by Matthew Larking

Paris-born Balthus Klossowski de Rola (1908-2001) is considered by some to be comparable to Picasso, though it was Picasso who said that Balthus was the "last great painter of the 20th century." From Picasso's Cubism onward, painting no longer needed to mirror the world ...

Contemporary art is not lost in space

Jul 18, 2014

Contemporary art is not lost in space

by John L. Tran

While space art is a relatively small field — in which works that have actually been created in space is an even smaller subset — it can only become more commonplace as costs fall and the private sector promises to open up space travel ...

To perceive is to see Felix Vallotton's genius at work

Jul 17, 2014

To perceive is to see Felix Vallotton's genius at work

by C.B. Liddell

The art of the Swiss painter Felix Vallotton is both deceptive and loaded with revelation. On the surface it has the knowing sophistication and social references of other fin-de-siècle art — Vallotton was active from the 1880s until his death in 1925 — but ...

Nao Tsuda takes us beyond the straight and narrow

Jul 17, 2014

Nao Tsuda takes us beyond the straight and narrow

by Stuart Munro

The walkways, ravines and peaks of the Himalayas, Tibet and Swiss Alps form the backdrop for “On the Mountain Path,” the latest photographic exhibition by Nao Tsuda at Gallery 916. Tsuda’s sizeable photographs show one man’s appreciation for landscapes’ resilience to inconstant climate and ...