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It's time to wise up to academic art

by C.B. Liddell

For too long the fine academic art of the 19th-century has lingered in the shadow of the Impressionist movement. The French Academy, with its rules and standards, has often been cast as the villain in the story of the period, standing in opposition to the "heroic" Impressionists in their quest ...

To perceive is to see Felix Vallotton's genius at work

Jul 17, 2014

To perceive is to see Felix Vallotton's genius at work

by C.B. Liddell

The art of the Swiss painter Felix Vallotton is both deceptive and loaded with revelation. On the surface it has the knowing sophistication and social references of other fin-de-siècle art — Vallotton was active from the 1880s until his death in 1925 — but ...

Nao Tsuda takes us beyond the straight and narrow

Jul 17, 2014

Nao Tsuda takes us beyond the straight and narrow

by Stuart Munro

The walkways, ravines and peaks of the Himalayas, Tibet and Swiss Alps form the backdrop for “On the Mountain Path,” the latest photographic exhibition by Nao Tsuda at Gallery 916. Tsuda’s sizeable photographs show one man’s appreciation for landscapes’ resilience to inconstant climate and ...

Kids' stuff that adults need to see

Jun 25, 2014

Kids' stuff that adults need to see

by John L. Tran

Perhaps in the wake of this attack on seriousness, many artists have since taken refuge in childishness, whimsy or playfulness, though these values have been carefully rationed in "Go-Betweens: The World Seen through Children," with the emphasis being more on showing childhood as a ...

The evolution of Seiki Kuroda

Jun 25, 2014

The evolution of Seiki Kuroda

by Matthew Larking

In all too-common sophomoric slight to artists is: "A child could have done that." Seiki Kuroda (1866-1924), the most significant Western-style painter in Japan's early modern history, however, shows that even some young adults can not accomplish what takes years to hone.

The Uemuras were not quite like mother, like son

Jun 18, 2014

The Uemuras were not quite like mother, like son

by Matthew Larking

Shoko Uemura (1902-2001) was born to Shoen Uemura, the most revered and financially successful female painter of the early modern period, who arguably did more to popularize the bijinga genre (pictures of beautiful women) than any other. Artistically, however, his mother is said to ...

Imagination runs wild in Japanese contemporary art

Jun 11, 2014

Imagination runs wild in Japanese contemporary art

by Matthew Larking

“Nostalgia and Fantasy: Imagination and its Origins in Contemporary Art” is a ragtag grouping of nine individual artists and one unit, each of whom focus on extremely different things. It is difficult to say, in fact, where “nostalgia” and “fantasy” come into play in ...