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‘Diana’

by Kaori Shoji

Among the crimes committed against Britain’s Princess Diana by her husband Charles was his letting slip in the royal circle that she was boring. Unfortunately, the movie “Diana” confirms his accusation. Directed by Oliver Hirschbiegel (best known for his Hitler movie “Downfall”), “Diana” is the portrayal of a world-famous woman by someone who doesn’t bother to look past the fame. Hirschbiegel’s Princess Di is boring.

At first, “Diana” promises to delve beneath the surface of the iconic princess (played by Naomi Watts on cruise control). Along the way, I’m guessing, Hirschbiegel got overwhelmed by his task and welched. For him, drawing Hitler was probably a breeze compared to presenting a more complex, darker side of the Princess of Wales. In “Diana,” she’s sad and lonely and very pretty, aspects Hirschbiegel takes to levels of talk-show banality. And the film’s focal point — the love affair between Di and a Pakistani heart surgeon (Naveen Andrews) — would take great effort to care much about. Still, one enjoyable moment comes when, avoiding paparazzi, Diana covers her face with luxury-brand shopping bags and starts running in Manolo pin heels. Go, princess.

For a chance to win one of three “Diana” air-fresheners, visit jtimes.jp/film.