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Another tax drama; murder mystery at the archery club; CM of the week: Delicare

Nippon TV obviously thinks we’re not sick of taxes yet because this week they launch a new drama series called “Tokkan” (Wed., 10 p.m.), an abbreviation of tokubetsu kokuzei chōshūkan, or “special national tax collection officer.”

Mao Inoue plays Miki Suzumiya, who wants a stable career in the public sector, but the only civil servant test she passes is the one for the national tax bureau. She’s assigned to the Muromachi office, where eventually she becomes the assistant to the titular collection officer, Kagami (Yukiya Kitamura). It turns out to be a much more exciting job than she could imagine.

Unlike other tax-related dramas, such as Juzo Itami’s “Marusa no Onna,” the officers in “Tokkan” don’t root out undeclared income. They already know who’s not paying their fair share. Their job is to extract the money that’s owed by any means necessary.

Another new series is an omnibus of one-hour mysteries written by best-selling author Keiko Tono. The premiere story is “Sayonara Kochi” (“Goodbye Coach”; Fuji TV, Thurs., 10 p.m.), starring Toshiaki Karasawa as a company archery coach.

Coach Ishigami is shocked to discover the body of one of his archers, Naomi (Reina Tanaka), who apparently committed suicide and left behind a cryptic farewell video. When a police detective named Suzuki asks him why he thinks Naomi killed herself, Ishigami can’t think of a reason. After the funeral the police formally declare the death a suicide, even though Suzuki isn’t completely convinced.

In the wake of Naomi’s death the archery club is shut down, and Ishigami decides to quit the company. Then things really turn strange.

CM of the Week:

Delicare: Delicare is a reassuring name for an over-the-counter topical ointment that relieves itching, but the commercial for Delicare M’s, a product specifically made for men, is anything but discreet. Basically it’s a treatment for crotch itch, and the ad shows an army of besuited salaryman standing on a train platform (the station? Kayumino, or “itchy plain”) singing a lusty song about how they can “cure” their affliction “without scratching” while performing a dance characterized by a suggestive plie motion. OK, we get the picture.