Having opened in Meiji 32 (1899), and serving its signature yakitori (grilled chicken), unagi (eel) and nabe (hot pot) for over 110 years, Miyakagi is one of Nagoya’s longest-running restaurants.

Although it can get very busy, diners can choose to either sit at the bustling bar and see their food get expertly grilled, or opt for a more private table away from the main room. But even here, most tables are merely divided by ...

Chic and airy, with a floor-to-ceiling window, all-white furnishings and a lavish flower arrangement in one corner, it feels more like a quiet cafe-lounge than a noodle joint. There’s even a glass-topped miniature Zen rock garden running the length of the (all-white of course) ...

There are a handful of other branches of What’s dotted around Kansai: What’s the Kitchen in Gion, two What’s butchers and What’s the Store in Shiga. This What’s is mid-priced; in Gion it’s expensive. What’s the story with the name? Although I asked, I ...

It’s certainly not the sort of place you’d enter on a whim. And even if you did, you’d be turned away, as it’s invariably full. If you like the intricacy of high-end Japanese cuisine but in a relaxed setting, then it’s well worth picking ...

With shio ramen, it’s best to think of the salt as both the composer and conductor of a gourmet symphony. And there is plenty going on in this symphony — thin noodles, chashu (braised pork), crunchy menma (bamboo shoots) and spring onions, all topped ...

This spin-off in the basement of the Roppongi Hills complex lies a few strides from the subway gates. Bright, cheerful and modern, it has a big open kitchen where you can watch the golden cutlets being deep-fried to crisp perfection. And it still has ...

It’s not the sort of place where you order, slurp and then dash off back to work. It feels cozy and comfortable, a place where you can settle in for a bit, even at lunchtime. And that is just as well, since Muto now ...

Inakatei is a gem of an izakaya. Obansai (Kyoto home-style cooking) features heavily, but not exclusively, on the menu. And if it’s fish you’ve come in search of, then you won’t be left wanting.

The chefs at Tepparnya make good use of the teppan, the hot plate that dominates the kitchen counter, and so should you. We had a rump of tender beef steak served on a chopping board with Dijon mustard, a pinch of salt and pepper ...

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