Besides being admirably affordable — this neighborhood has long been the domain of students and low-status salarymen — the cooking is assured and the menu remarkably adventurous.

First you pick your wine from the various bottles Tanabe has assembled that week. Your food, all prepared by Kaneko and his team, will be matched with your choices. It is not quite as arbitrary as it sounds, but there’s definitely a frisson of ...

Pride of place in the kitchen — and on the menu — goes to the meat course. This is Shimizu’s specialty.

Cast your eye down the menu and you will find it infused with a similar interplay of influences. Chef Kimio Ichikawa is well-grounded in the basics of French cuisine, but he brings a homegrown Japanese sensibility to his art. A quiet man who prefers ...

Chef Kimio Ichikawa is well-grounded in the basics of French cuisine, but he brings a homegrown Japanese sensibility to his art. A quiet man who prefers to let his food do the talking, he also has a love for the smoky, spicy flavors of ...

He cooks in the modern Tokyo idiom, unafraid to fuse Japanese delicacy and outside influences to French fundamentals. At lunchtime he keeps it simple, catering to the impatient office crowd. It is at dinnertime that Restaurant t.r comes into its own.

This is the great thing about Harmonie. You can settle in upstairs for a full-scale dinner with a grand cru, or you can sit downstairs and snack on light bistro fare. You can drop by early in the evening for a quick pastis, or ...

In our book, anything that’s been slowly grilled over charcoal — and as long as it’s not slathered in a thick, savory, soy-based tare sauce — goes beautifully with wine. And if the kitchen is using fine ingredients and premium charcoal, especially the variety ...

Voisin is a chef who obviously loves his metier and his new kitchen. From time to time, he emerges from the kitchen to greet his customers, eager to talk about ingredients, cooking techniques and the pleasure he is deriving from being here in Japan.

There are half a dozen choices of hors d’oeuvres, a couple of soups, and half a dozen main dishes. All derive from the basic brasserie tradition, but everything is executed with great expertise.

Vin Picoeur describes its genre as “French barbecue” — and the centerpiece of the restaurant is the charcoal grill — but it looks and functions much like an izakaya. Think kushi-yaki and oden, but given a totally Western twist.

Notice: Event and location information is subject to change.