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‘Landmark’ ruling sent Japan’s foreign residents back to welfare limbo

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This month’s Labor Pains is not really about a labor issue per se. The life of a worker is more than work. We don’t toil from cradle to grave.

There are times when we cannot work due to sickness or injury, although in Japan, many force themselves to labor through both, as indeed my translator and editor happen to be doing at this very moment. Unhealthy devotion to work is a serious problem in our society, so I’m a bit of a hypocrite to ask them for their help despite their painful injuries.

There are also times when we cannot find work despite being able-bodied. Today, I’d like to talk about the system in place to protect you when all other safety nets fail. I want to discuss the difference in the rights foreign and Japanese citizens have when it comes to seikatsu hogo, or welfare. I want to dispel the profound misunderstandings surrounding the 2014 Supreme Court verdict about the right foreign residents have — or don’t have — to welfare.

The welfare system here provides financial support for daily living, medical, housing, education, nursing and other costs to those who cannot make ends meet. The legal foundation lies in Article 25 of the Constitution, which guarantees our seizonken, or right to life. Specifically, it says, “All people shall have the right to maintain the minimum standards of wholesome and cultured living.”

The Constitution forms both the foundational norms and supreme law of the nation. The right to life as stipulated there carries enormous weight. This article protects not just the freedom to live but the right to life. This article was introduced by “New Dealer” members of the U.S. Occupation administration who wanted to introduce a liberal democracy that went beyond what they were able to manage back home after the Great Depression.

When looking at the Constitution, it’s important to note the subject of the pronouncements, when there even is one. Sometimes it’s nanbito mo, referring to all human beings. Sometimes it’s kinrōsha, or workers. Sometimes there is no subject, which is interpreted to mean all human beings, just like “nanbito mo.” But Article 25 uses the subject kokumin, or “the nation’s people.” The English translation uses the word “people,” yet “kokumin” in Japan has been interpreted as being limited to Japanese citizens, with foreign nationals protected in some cases.

The Supreme Court made it crystal clear that “kokumin” only applies to Japanese on March 2, 1989. Hide Shiomi, a Korean national who had lived in Japan her whole life (a Zainichi), lost her sight as a small child. She applied for a disability pension but was turned down because she had not chosen to take Japanese citizenship. (Incidentally, she later naturalized.) The pension law at the time covered only Japanese people. She sued, arguing that the law and the refusal to grant her the pension violated the constitutional protection conferred by Articles 25 and 14 (which guarantees “equality under the law”). The Supreme Court ruled that “kokumin” means Japanese only.

“Deciding who is eligible for disbursement of a disability pension is a matter under the broad discretionary powers of the legislature,” the court decreed, meaning that the central government was free to make a political decision regarding how noncitizens are covered by social insurance. The court carved into stone the following: “With limited finances, treating Japanese people in a manner advantageous in comparison with foreigners is acceptable.”

In the 1980s, Japan ratified the Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees, which guarantees the principle of equality between Japanese and foreign nationals. This led to the elimination of citizenship rules for the national pension and health insurance systems. In fact, enrollment became not just a right but an obligation, even for foreign residents.

The sole Japanese-only safety-net eligibility requirement to remain was in welfare law. Five years after Japan’s defeat in World War II, a directive was issued by the government concerning foreigners’ eligibility: “If they suddenly find themselves in a severe, harsh situation such that abandoning them would be inhumane, and if there are no other way to redress the situation, the (welfare) law may be applied on a mutatis mutandis basis for the time being.”

This Medieval Latin phrase translates as “the necessary changes having been made” or “once the necessary changes have been made.” In this context, the directive seems to be saying that the Welfare Law can be applied to noncitizens too, but only after certain obvious adjustments have been made. The problem comes from the fact that we may not all agree on what adjustments are “obvious.” The Japanese word is junyō or junjite.

In 1954, another directive came out using the same phrase and underlining the understanding that foreign residents are not eligible for welfare in a straightforward manner under the law as citizens are, but only mutatis mutandis.

Both directives said the interpretation will serve as a stopgap measure “for the time being,” yet that time being has ended up lasting more than six decades, as the government has been too lazy to turn the stopgap into a final determination. Thus today, foreigners’ right to welfare continues to be applied mutatis mutandis.

Note that even this right applies only to non-Japanese with permanent resident, special permanent resident, spousal and spouse of permanent resident visas. So that there is distinction/discrimination even among foreigners.

What is the practical difference between the direct application (tekiyō) for Japanese citizens and the junyō application for foreign nationals? In truth, almost none. If I convey nothing else in today’s column, I hope it is this: Foreign residents can get welfare just like Japanese citizens do. They follow the same procedures, undergo the same screening and receive the same amounts. The only meaningful difference is that when noncitizens are turned down, they have no legal recourse to appeal the decision, whereas Japanese do.

But what you cannot appeal within a bureaucracy you can always challenge in court. A Chinese woman in Oita Prefecture did just that. This courageous woman claimed that foreign residents have the right to welfare. The outcome of this court case has been greatly misunderstood in both the vernacular and English-language media.

The plaintiff was born in Japan in 1932 and has permanent resident status. She speaks no Chinese. She ran a small restaurant with her Japanese husband, but he became ill and had to stop working. They lived on the income from a small parking lot they owned.

Her husband was hospitalized with dementia. The husband’s brother moved in with the woman and began subjecting her to violence and verbal abuse (bōgen). He also confiscated both his brother’s and the plaintiff’s bank passbooks, which in Japan are necessary to access the bank accounts. He eventually kicked out his sister-in-law from her own home.

The woman had no choice but to find refuge in a hospital. Being without money, she applied for welfare. The local welfare office turned her down because — and this is very important — she and her husband had a total of ¥2 million in their bank accounts in addition to a monthly income of ¥500,000. From the office’s perspective, she and her husband did not need welfare. The fact that she had zero access to her money would not have featured in the paperwork. There is no column that asks, “Does your brother-in-law beat you?”To a functionary, money in the bank is money in the bank.

The plaintiff was not in any way turned down for welfare because she was a foreign national. This is one aspect that has been widely misunderstood by the media.

The woman appealed the decision, but the governor of Oita Prefecture noted that non-Japanese don’t have a direct tekiyō right to welfare, meaning she didn’t have the right to appeal. He rejected the appeal on that basis, and she sued to overturn the ruling.

The Oita District Court upheld the governor’s decision in 2010. The court agreed she had no right to appeal since her right to welfare was junyō, and that her situation did not qualify for welfare anyway. The Fukuoka High Court threw a spanner in the works, however, when it ruled in November 2011 that foreign residents’ right to welfare goes beyond junyō and is “protected by the law.” This second tribunal said she had the right to appeal. The Fukuoka ruling marked the first time in postwar Japan that a noncitizen’s direct legal right to welfare was upheld, and it represented a potentially huge step forward for foreigners’ rights. In a sense, it meant that non-Japanese could now get welfare through the front rather than the back door.

Oita city appealed to the Supreme Court, which on July 18, 2014, reversed the high court’s decision and returned the legal interpretation to what it had been for six decades.

“The Welfare Law stipulates eligibility in Articles 1 and 2 for kokumin, which means Japanese people and does not include foreigners,” the land’s highest court ruled, going on to say that the directives make clear that “foreigners are not afforded the protection of the Welfare Law but that essential protection can be granted as a de facto administrative measure through the same procedures as for Japanese citizens.”

The Supreme Court simply upheld the practice of 60 years for non-Japanese applying for welfare. The big news is that there is nothing new about this. The ruling has had no impact whatsoever on the ability or right of foreign nationals to get welfare. The right was and is applied mutatis mutandis.

But reaction has been intense. Chat rooms were abuzz with netto uyoku (rightwing netizens) applauding the verdict that “took away the right of foreigners to get welfare.” Those hostile to Koreans and Chinese people were particularly elated by the verdict. Many claim, without evidence, that non-Japanese receive welfare illegitimately and fraudulently. Left-wingers and civil rights groups blasted the verdict as an unconscionable attack on human rights.

Both sides referred to this as a “landmark” case, but both have misunderstood the verdict, and Facebook and other social networks are spreading this misunderstanding. It’s worth repeating: Nothing has changed. Foreign residents continue to receive welfare just as they did before the verdict, and in practice pass the screening process just as often, if not more often, than Japanese do.

A foreign friend of mine summed it up as follows: “What this Supreme Court verdict means is that foreigners cannot openly demand welfare as a right. Foreigners can get it but must hang their heads in appreciation.” Unfortunately, this is in fact a neat summation of the ruling. Legal limbo for the more than 2 million foreign nationals living in Japan will continue “for the time being.”

Hifumi Okunuki teaches at Sagami Women’s University and serves as executive president of Tozen Union. She can be reached at tozen.okunuki@gmail.com. Labor Pains appears in print on the fourth Monday Community Page of the month. Your comments and story ideas: community@japantimes.co.jp

  • Jonathan Bethune

    I am confused. Why is a person who makes 500,000 yen per month and has 2 million yen in the bank seeking welfare? The claim is that she does not have access to her money because her brother in law stole her bank book. Why can she not go to a bank, prove her identity, and get a new book? Why is there no criminal case being pursued against the brother in law? It seems to me that the welfare office was right to turn her down.

    The last point on welfare in Japan generally: “Foreigners can get it but must hang their heads in appreciation.” Generally I do not have a problem with this attitude. You could argue that we should make a distinction between recent foreigners lacking permanent residency and longterm residents such as the woman in the article who had lived in Japan for decades. Nevertheless, immigrants should not move to a new country and feel entitled to that society’s support.

    • MasaF

      Don’t you figure that if she could have done this that she would have? Or the court or someone would have pointed it out to her?

    • incumbent

      You’re right. It does seem that the court was correct to turn her down, and it was stellar stupidity to risk establishing precedent on such a potentially spurious claim. Could not the brother-in-law been colluding to obtain unwarranted benefits? Criminal charges again the brother-in-law seem the appropriate remedy, as you suggest (if not simply a trip to the bank to re-establish the identity of the would-be welfare plaintiff). Why was the old Chinese woman presented in Okunuki’s narrative as a sympathetic figure?

      Either something is awry with the story, presented here or she is heinous, rather than “courageous,” for instigating this potentially detrimental case law. The judiciary, too, seems at fault for using this incident to formulate policy rather than remanding it to the appropriate venue.

      • Jonathan Fields

        This post is so on point that an up-vote just wasn’t enough. Nicely put.

    • tisho

      Well then they should have it deduced from their taxes. Why would anyone wanna pay for something he will never receive? Foreigners are made to pay taxes when they work, and part of their taxes goes for welfare, which they are not allowed to use. That’s like paying for a ticket for a concert, and then being told ”oh sorry, we used your money to buy a ticket for the locals only”. Anyway, the entire welfare system should be scrapped, but Japan is still way way far away from having that debate.

      • Helen Hernandez

        ::f313Work At Home….Special Report….Earn 18k+ per monthfew days ago new McLaren. F1 bought after earning 18,512$,,,this was my previous month’s paycheck ,and-a little over, 17k$ Last month ..3-5 h/r of work a days ..with extra open doors & weekly. paychecks.. it’s realy the easiest work I have ever Do.. I Joined This 7 months ago and now making over 87$, p/h.Learn. More right Here::f313➤➤➤➤➤ http://www.insiderexpress22.com.­nu .❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:::::::f313…….

      • Helen Hernandez

        ::f313Work At Home….Special Report….Earn 18k+ per monthfew days ago new McLaren. F1 bought after earning 18,512$,,,this was my previous month’s paycheck ,and-a little over, 17k$ Last month ..3-5 h/r of work a days ..with extra open doors & weekly. paychecks.. it’s realy the easiest work I have ever Do.. I Joined This 7 months ago and now making over 87$, p/h.Learn. More right Here::f313➤➤➤➤➤ http://www.insiderexpress22.com.­nu .❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:::::::f313…….

      • Helen Hernandez

        ::f313Work At Home….Special Report….Earn 18k+ per monthfew days ago new McLaren. F1 bought after earning 18,512$,,,this was my previous month’s paycheck ,and-a little over, 17k$ Last month ..3-5 h/r of work a days ..with extra open doors & weekly. paychecks.. it’s realy the easiest work I have ever Do.. I Joined This 7 months ago and now making over 87$, p/h.Learn. More right Here::f313➤➤➤➤➤ http://www.insiderexpress22.com.­nu .❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:::::::f313…….

      • Helen Hernandez

        ::f313Work At Home….Special Report….Earn 18k+ per monthfew days ago new McLaren. F1 bought after earning 18,512$,,,this was my previous month’s paycheck ,and-a little over, 17k$ Last month ..3-5 h/r of work a days ..with extra open doors & weekly. paychecks.. it’s realy the easiest work I have ever Do.. I Joined This 7 months ago and now making over 87$, p/h.Learn. More right Here::f313➤➤➤➤➤ http://www.insiderexpress22.com.­nu .❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:::::::f313…….

      • Helen Hernandez

        ::f313Work At Home….Special Report….Earn 18k+ per monthfew days ago new McLaren. F1 bought after earning 18,512$,,,this was my previous month’s paycheck ,and-a little over, 17k$ Last month ..3-5 h/r of work a days ..with extra open doors & weekly. paychecks.. it’s realy the easiest work I have ever Do.. I Joined This 7 months ago and now making over 87$, p/h.Learn. More right Here::f313➤➤➤➤➤ http://www.insiderexpress22.com.­nu .❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:::::::f313…….

      • Helen Hernandez

        ::f313Work At Home….Special Report….Earn 18k+ per monthfew days ago new McLaren. F1 bought after earning 18,512$,,,this was my previous month’s paycheck ,and-a little over, 17k$ Last month ..3-5 h/r of work a days ..with extra open doors & weekly. paychecks.. it’s realy the easiest work I have ever Do.. I Joined This 7 months ago and now making over 87$, p/h.Learn. More right Here::f313➤➤➤➤➤ http://www.insiderexpress22.com.­nu .❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:::::::f313…….

      • Helen Hernandez

        ::f313Work At Home….Special Report….Earn 18k+ per monthfew days ago new McLaren. F1 bought after earning 18,512$,,,this was my previous month’s paycheck ,and-a little over, 17k$ Last month ..3-5 h/r of work a days ..with extra open doors & weekly. paychecks.. it’s realy the easiest work I have ever Do.. I Joined This 7 months ago and now making over 87$, p/h.Learn. More right Here::f313➤➤➤➤➤ http://www.insiderexpress22.com.­nu .❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:::::::f313…….

      • Helen Hernandez

        ::f313Work At Home….Special Report….Earn 18k+ per monthfew days ago new McLaren. F1 bought after earning 18,512$,,,this was my previous month’s paycheck ,and-a little over, 17k$ Last month ..3-5 h/r of work a days ..with extra open doors & weekly. paychecks.. it’s realy the easiest work I have ever Do.. I Joined This 7 months ago and now making over 87$, p/h.Learn. More right Here::f313➤➤➤➤➤ http://www.insiderexpress22.com.­nu .❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:::::::f313…….

      • Helen Hernandez

        ::f313Work At Home….Special Report….Earn 18k+ per monthfew days ago new McLaren. F1 bought after earning 18,512$,,,this was my previous month’s paycheck ,and-a little over, 17k$ Last month ..3-5 h/r of work a days ..with extra open doors & weekly. paychecks.. it’s realy the easiest work I have ever Do.. I Joined This 7 months ago and now making over 87$, p/h.Learn. More right Here::f313➤➤➤➤➤ http://www.insiderexpress22.com.­nu .❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:::::::f313…….

      • Helen Hernandez

        ::f313Work At Home….Special Report….Earn 18k+ per monthfew days ago new McLaren. F1 bought after earning 18,512$,,,this was my previous month’s paycheck ,and-a little over, 17k$ Last month ..3-5 h/r of work a days ..with extra open doors & weekly. paychecks.. it’s realy the easiest work I have ever Do.. I Joined This 7 months ago and now making over 87$, p/h.Learn. More right Here::f313➤➤➤➤➤ http://www.insiderexpress22.com.­nu .❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:::::::f313…….

      • Helen Hernandez

        ::f313Work At Home….Special Report….Earn 18k+ per monthfew days ago new McLaren. F1 bought after earning 18,512$,,,this was my previous month’s paycheck ,and-a little over, 17k$ Last month ..3-5 h/r of work a days ..with extra open doors & weekly. paychecks.. it’s realy the easiest work I have ever Do.. I Joined This 7 months ago and now making over 87$, p/h.Learn. More right Here::f313➤➤➤➤➤ http://www.insiderexpress22.com.­nu .❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:::::::f313…….

      • Helen Hernandez

        ::f313Work At Home….Special Report….Earn 18k+ per monthfew days ago new McLaren. F1 bought after earning 18,512$,,,this was my previous month’s paycheck ,and-a little over, 17k$ Last month ..3-5 h/r of work a days ..with extra open doors & weekly. paychecks.. it’s realy the easiest work I have ever Do.. I Joined This 7 months ago and now making over 87$, p/h.Learn. More right Here::f313➤➤➤➤➤ http://www.insiderexpress22.com.­nu .❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:::::::f313…….

      • Helen Hernandez

        ::f313Work At Home….Special Report….Earn 18k+ per monthfew days ago new McLaren. F1 bought after earning 18,512$,,,this was my previous month’s paycheck ,and-a little over, 17k$ Last month ..3-5 h/r of work a days ..with extra open doors & weekly. paychecks.. it’s realy the easiest work I have ever Do.. I Joined This 7 months ago and now making over 87$, p/h.Learn. More right Here::f313➤➤➤➤➤ http://www.insiderexpress22.com.­nu .❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:::::::f313…….

      • Helen Hernandez

        ::f313Work At Home….Special Report….Earn 18k+ per monthfew days ago new McLaren. F1 bought after earning 18,512$,,,this was my previous month’s paycheck ,and-a little over, 17k$ Last month ..3-5 h/r of work a days ..with extra open doors & weekly. paychecks.. it’s realy the easiest work I have ever Do.. I Joined This 7 months ago and now making over 87$, p/h.Learn. More right Here::f313➤➤➤➤➤ http://www.insiderexpress22.com.­nu .❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:::::::f313…….

      • Helen Hernandez

        ::f313Work At Home….Special Report….Earn 18k+ per monthfew days ago new McLaren. F1 bought after earning 18,512$,,,this was my previous month’s paycheck ,and-a little over, 17k$ Last month ..3-5 h/r of work a days ..with extra open doors & weekly. paychecks.. it’s realy the easiest work I have ever Do.. I Joined This 7 months ago and now making over 87$, p/h.Learn. More right Here::f313➤➤➤➤➤ http://www.insiderexpress22.com.­nu .❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:::::::f313…….

      • Helen Hernandez

        ::f313Work At Home….Special Report….Earn 18k+ per monthfew days ago new McLaren. F1 bought after earning 18,512$,,,this was my previous month’s paycheck ,and-a little over, 17k$ Last month ..3-5 h/r of work a days ..with extra open doors & weekly. paychecks.. it’s realy the easiest work I have ever Do.. I Joined This 7 months ago and now making over 87$, p/h.Learn. More right Here::f313➤➤➤➤➤ http://www.insiderexpress22.com.­nu .❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:::::::f313…….

      • Helen Hernandez

        ::f313Work At Home….Special Report….Earn 18k+ per monthfew days ago new McLaren. F1 bought after earning 18,512$,,,this was my previous month’s paycheck ,and-a little over, 17k$ Last month ..3-5 h/r of work a days ..with extra open doors & weekly. paychecks.. it’s realy the easiest work I have ever Do.. I Joined This 7 months ago and now making over 87$, p/h.Learn. More right Here::f313➤➤➤➤➤ http://www.insiderexpress22.com.­nu .❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:::::::f313…….

      • Helen Hernandez

        ::f313Work At Home….Special Report….Earn 18k+ per monthfew days ago new McLaren. F1 bought after earning 18,512$,,,this was my previous month’s paycheck ,and-a little over, 17k$ Last month ..3-5 h/r of work a days ..with extra open doors & weekly. paychecks.. it’s realy the easiest work I have ever Do.. I Joined This 7 months ago and now making over 87$, p/h.Learn. More right Here::f313➤➤➤➤➤ http://www.insiderexpress22.com.­nu .❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:::::::f313…….

      • Helen Hernandez

        ::f313Work At Home….Special Report….Earn 18k+ per monthfew days ago new McLaren. F1 bought after earning 18,512$,,,this was my previous month’s paycheck ,and-a little over, 17k$ Last month ..3-5 h/r of work a days ..with extra open doors & weekly. paychecks.. it’s realy the easiest work I have ever Do.. I Joined This 7 months ago and now making over 87$, p/h.Learn. More right Here::f313➤➤➤➤➤ http://www.insiderexpress22.com.­nu .❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:::::::f313…….

      • Helen Hernandez

        ::f313Work At Home….Special Report….Earn 18k+ per monthfew days ago new McLaren. F1 bought after earning 18,512$,,,this was my previous month’s paycheck ,and-a little over, 17k$ Last month ..3-5 h/r of work a days ..with extra open doors & weekly. paychecks.. it’s realy the easiest work I have ever Do.. I Joined This 7 months ago and now making over 87$, p/h.Learn. More right Here::f313➤➤➤➤➤ http://www.insiderexpress22.com.­nu .❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:::::::f313…….

      • Helen Hernandez

        ::f313Work At Home….Special Report….Earn 18k+ per monthfew days ago new McLaren. F1 bought after earning 18,512$,,,this was my previous month’s paycheck ,and-a little over, 17k$ Last month ..3-5 h/r of work a days ..with extra open doors & weekly. paychecks.. it’s realy the easiest work I have ever Do.. I Joined This 7 months ago and now making over 87$, p/h.Learn. More right Here::f313➤➤➤➤➤ http://www.insiderexpress22.com.­nu .❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:::::::f313…….

      • Helen Hernandez

        ::f313Work At Home….Special Report….Earn 18k+ per monthfew days ago new McLaren. F1 bought after earning 18,512$,,,this was my previous month’s paycheck ,and-a little over, 17k$ Last month ..3-5 h/r of work a days ..with extra open doors & weekly. paychecks.. it’s realy the easiest work I have ever Do.. I Joined This 7 months ago and now making over 87$, p/h.Learn. More right Here::f313➤➤➤➤➤ http://www.insiderexpress22.com.­nu .❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:::::::f313…….

      • Helen Hernandez

        ::f313Work At Home….Special Report….Earn 18k+ per monthfew days ago new McLaren. F1 bought after earning 18,512$,,,this was my previous month’s paycheck ,and-a little over, 17k$ Last month ..3-5 h/r of work a days ..with extra open doors & weekly. paychecks.. it’s realy the easiest work I have ever Do.. I Joined This 7 months ago and now making over 87$, p/h.Learn. More right Here::f313➤➤➤➤➤ http://www.insiderexpress22.com.­nu .❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:::::::f313…….

      • Helen Hernandez

        ::f313Work At Home….Special Report….Earn 18k+ per monthfew days ago new McLaren. F1 bought after earning 18,512$,,,this was my previous month’s paycheck ,and-a little over, 17k$ Last month ..3-5 h/r of work a days ..with extra open doors & weekly. paychecks.. it’s realy the easiest work I have ever Do.. I Joined This 7 months ago and now making over 87$, p/h.Learn. More right Here::f313➤➤➤➤➤ http://www.insiderexpress22.com.­nu .❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:::::::f313…….

      • Helen Hernandez

        ::f313Work At Home….Special Report….Earn 18k+ per monthfew days ago new McLaren. F1 bought after earning 18,512$,,,this was my previous month’s paycheck ,and-a little over, 17k$ Last month ..3-5 h/r of work a days ..with extra open doors & weekly. paychecks.. it’s realy the easiest work I have ever Do.. I Joined This 7 months ago and now making over 87$, p/h.Learn. More right Here::f313➤➤➤➤➤ http://www.insiderexpress22.com.­nu .❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:::::::f313…….

      • Helen Hernandez

        ::f313Work At Home….Special Report….Earn 18k+ per monthfew days ago new McLaren. F1 bought after earning 18,512$,,,this was my previous month’s paycheck ,and-a little over, 17k$ Last month ..3-5 h/r of work a days ..with extra open doors & weekly. paychecks.. it’s realy the easiest work I have ever Do.. I Joined This 7 months ago and now making over 87$, p/h.Learn. More right Here::f313➤➤➤➤➤ http://www.insiderexpress22.com.­nu .❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:::::::f313…….

      • Helen Hernandez

        ::f313Work At Home….Special Report….Earn 18k+ per monthfew days ago new McLaren. F1 bought after earning 18,512$,,,this was my previous month’s paycheck ,and-a little over, 17k$ Last month ..3-5 h/r of work a days ..with extra open doors & weekly. paychecks.. it’s realy the easiest work I have ever Do.. I Joined This 7 months ago and now making over 87$, p/h.Learn. More right Here::f313➤➤➤➤➤ http://www.insiderexpress22.com.­nu .❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:::::::f313…….

      • Helen Hernandez

        ::f313Work At Home….Special Report….Earn 18k+ per monthfew days ago new McLaren. F1 bought after earning 18,512$,,,this was my previous month’s paycheck ,and-a little over, 17k$ Last month ..3-5 h/r of work a days ..with extra open doors & weekly. paychecks.. it’s realy the easiest work I have ever Do.. I Joined This 7 months ago and now making over 87$, p/h.Learn. More right Here::f313➤➤➤➤➤ http://www.insiderexpress22.com.­nu .❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:::::::f313…….

      • Helen Hernandez

        ::f313Work At Home….Special Report….Earn 18k+ per monthfew days ago new McLaren. F1 bought after earning 18,512$,,,this was my previous month’s paycheck ,and-a little over, 17k$ Last month ..3-5 h/r of work a days ..with extra open doors & weekly. paychecks.. it’s realy the easiest work I have ever Do.. I Joined This 7 months ago and now making over 87$, p/h.Learn. More right Here::f313➤➤➤➤➤ http://www.insiderexpress22.com.­nu .❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:::::::f313…….

      • Helen Hernandez

        ::f313Work At Home….Special Report….Earn 18k+ per monthfew days ago new McLaren. F1 bought after earning 18,512$,,,this was my previous month’s paycheck ,and-a little over, 17k$ Last month ..3-5 h/r of work a days ..with extra open doors & weekly. paychecks.. it’s realy the easiest work I have ever Do.. I Joined This 7 months ago and now making over 87$, p/h.Learn. More right Here::f313➤➤➤➤➤ http://www.insiderexpress22.com.­nu .❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:::::::f313…….

      • Helen Hernandez

        ::f313Work At Home….Special Report….Earn 18k+ per monthfew days ago new McLaren. F1 bought after earning 18,512$,,,this was my previous month’s paycheck ,and-a little over, 17k$ Last month ..3-5 h/r of work a days ..with extra open doors & weekly. paychecks.. it’s realy the easiest work I have ever Do.. I Joined This 7 months ago and now making over 87$, p/h.Learn. More right Here::f313➤➤➤➤➤ http://www.insiderexpress22.com.­nu .❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:::::::f313…….

      • Helen Hernandez

        ::f313Work At Home….Special Report….Earn 18k+ per monthfew days ago new McLaren. F1 bought after earning 18,512$,,,this was my previous month’s paycheck ,and-a little over, 17k$ Last month ..3-5 h/r of work a days ..with extra open doors & weekly. paychecks.. it’s realy the easiest work I have ever Do.. I Joined This 7 months ago and now making over 87$, p/h.Learn. More right Here::f313➤➤➤➤➤ http://www.insiderexpress22.com.­nu .❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:::::::f313…….

      • Helen Hernandez

        ::f313Work At Home….Special Report….Earn 18k+ per monthfew days ago new McLaren. F1 bought after earning 18,512$,,,this was my previous month’s paycheck ,and-a little over, 17k$ Last month ..3-5 h/r of work a days ..with extra open doors & weekly. paychecks.. it’s realy the easiest work I have ever Do.. I Joined This 7 months ago and now making over 87$, p/h.Learn. More right Here::f313➤➤➤➤➤ http://www.insiderexpress22.com.­nu .❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:::::::f313…….

      • Helen Hernandez

        ::f313Work At Home….Special Report….Earn 18k+ per monthfew days ago new McLaren. F1 bought after earning 18,512$,,,this was my previous month’s paycheck ,and-a little over, 17k$ Last month ..3-5 h/r of work a days ..with extra open doors & weekly. paychecks.. it’s realy the easiest work I have ever Do.. I Joined This 7 months ago and now making over 87$, p/h.Learn. More right Here::f313➤➤➤➤➤ http://www.insiderexpress22.com.­nu .❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:❦2:::::::f313…….

      • Blair

        They’re paying for the luxury of living in a society in which they’ve chosen to come and work. If they are unable to secure work, they are still eligible for welfare as the article states, even though a requirement of being in Japan is the ability for one to support oneself. The state reserves the right to determine whether or not they are legitimate candidates for welfare or whether they are abusing the charity of the Japanese people.

      • Jonathan Fields

        No. I shouldn’t have to pay for welfare in a society in which I’m not entitled to it. I’ve never had employment issues, but I accepted having to pay a ton of money in “social insurance” because I had a safety net. Now that I know I don’t necessarily have that net, it makes me very angry.

        On the other hand, if you come to the country (and weren’t tricked into it or dragged here as many Nikkeijin are) and haven’t paid into the system, I see no problem in being denied that money (unless it would be inhumane as it says in the article).

      • Blair

        You have the benefit of living in a society that facilitates your making a living. You enjoy the safety and convenience that society provides. You have the option of becoming a citizen in that society if you’d like to be entitled to the benefits of a full citizen. If not, the State is more often then not benevolent when it comes to caring for you as a non-citizen even if you break the contract you’ve made with the State in which you’ve agreed that you must have the requisite means of employment or finances that is a primary condition of your being here. If you are unable to support yourself, then your native country is responsible for your welfare not Japan. Japan is responsible for the welfare of its citizens. The issuing of welfare to non-citizens is benevolent charity and should be appreciated as such

      • Jonathan Fields

        That’s silly. Just because I chose to be here doesn’t mean I should gratefully accept whatever treatment I get. That’s just a hair away from the “if you don’t like it, you can get out” argument we all hear so much on JT. A lot of my money goes to pay for Japanese people who are far less productive than I. There’s a guy that lives down the street from me who is on welfare and he’s a huge kinjo meiwaku. He’s noisy, his house is a disastrous eyesore, and he never follows the trash-sorting rules. As far as I can tell, he is not mentally ill. It’s downright stupid that he, having never having worked a day in his life, should be entitled to that safety net just because he was born here but I should not. If I’m paying (a lot), I should get it. If I’m not getting it, I shouldn’t have to pay. I pay plenty of other taxes to make my fair share of the “society that facilitates [my] making a living.” I don’t foresee myself ever needing to use the system, but it’s still unfair.

      • Blair

        Not “whatever” treatment you get. Not getting welfare when you are no longer able to perform the job that got you into the country in the first place is most definitely NOT…whatever treatment you get. It’s incumbent on you as a foreign national to have either sufficient finances or the means to support yourself while you are here. Those are the terms you agreed to before setting foot here. That there are natives undeserving of welfare who abuse the system has nothing to do with you. This is their country and their social system. Whether they work a single day in their lives doesn’t preclude them from the benefits and rights of citizenship. Follow the rules, pay your NHK fees, stay out of trouble for 10 years and become a citizen…or not. the CHOICE is up to you. I think the State is pretty generous to provide welfare to those it doesn’t have to by law and pretty smart to protect itself from abuse where it can. Also, you don’t actually pay a lot of taxes, compared to a lot of other countries. You live in a prosperous, safe society which is why you stay. Become a citizen and make the full commitment to the State before you ask the State to make a full commitment to you

      • Jonathan Fields

        Wanting your payments into the system to actually give you a safety net is not a selfish idea in the least. “They were born here so XYZ” is a far more childish thought process than one based on productivity. And it’s not just about me. There are Nikkei laborers all over the country that are lured here by recruiters and then thrown under a bus when they outlive their utility. Is it fair for them not to get the support they paid for?

      • Blair

        What happens to those workers?

      • Jonathan Fields

        Well, now I know your strange point of view comes from ignorance. The Japanese welfare system has a number of measures that encourage people to find employment. In many places, the payments are deferred for a month or more and are continent upon finding some kind of contract. What you get is also based on your reason for being unemployed and the amount you paid into the system in the first place. You are required to go to HelloWork and try to find a job. If your prospects are poor and you seem unlikely to pay back into the system at a later date, your payments will be reduced. They can even be as low as 30% of the money paid in. Should you accept those conditions the remaining percentage cannot be claimed in the future. There might be some people like those you mentioned (though I highly doubt your story about the long term resident), but the system is designed for people who want to work. The ruling that foreigners can be denied unemployment and cannot appeal the decision should make people who pay into the system, want to work, and want to follow the rules angry.

      • Blair

        Well, you seem to know a great deal about the welfare system. Do you also know it’s the law that you must pay NHK fees. I suppose you choose what laws are applicable to you with your full height so big and strong and defiant…I guess you can kiss that citizenship good-bye. Not that you’d ever make the commitment. It’s only when you are in need that matters, when the State is in need (say if and when it comes under attack), then well…can’t get on that plane quick enough…watch your head on the door with that height

      • Jonathan Fields

        Wrong again, Blair. You’re just full of ignorance. The law does not apply to households with no TVs. I have no TV and therefore am not required to pay their ridiculous fee. When they come to my house and night and try to say I’ve been watching and they have a “viewing history” for my place, I tell them to shove off. But you with your love of Japan would just pay the fee regardless? You’re a noble, noble man.

      • Blair

        Of course, I pay the fee. It’s my duty. Besides. my son is a regular on an NHK TV show so it comes back in spades

      • Jonathan Fields

        Yeah, you try to bring that up in any and every thread you can lololol.

      • Blair

        I’m pretty sure, I only mentioned it once about 6 months ago in a related issue about the treatment of bi-racial kids here, but go ahead and gussy up the narrative if you like. You and I know different. The point is I live in Japan and NHK provides a public service from which I benefit. We pay very little in income and sales taxes here…kicking into the kitty for services or for foreigners who find themselves destitute isn’t an issue with me. Foreigners demanding the same rights as citizens is

      • Jonathan Fields

        Now I see. You became a Japanese citizen and you feel you are entitled to more than lowly foreigners on working visas. I’m not asking for much. I just think the services I pay for should apply to me. I’m not asking for the vote or something. Anyways, if the commenter below is correct, this ruling doesn’t mean what the JT headlines have implied anyway. So the discussion is over.

      • Blair

        I’m not Japanese

      • Jonathan Fields

        Reading comprehension much?

      • Blair

        What’s that, your 14 year old girl impersonation? It’s pretty good

      • Jonathan Fields

        I’ve also paid thousands and thousands of dollars into the national health insurance. I never use it, but I have no problem with it because I know it’s part of maintaining society and I know I have access should I need it. If the Japanese government decided one day that foreigners had to pay the national health insurance but could be denied its use with no chance of appeal, would you be OK with that as well?

      • Blair

        Health insurance is different because whatever service you’re providing depends on your being healthy to perform it.

      • Jonathan Fields

        What if I’m a stay-at-home parent with a haigusha visa whose productivity and conditions for staying aren’t necessarily tied to my health? By your logic it would be totally OK to take away my health insurance.

      • Blair

        But you have health insurance with a spousal visa…so these hypotheticals are pretty useless. What if…you renounced your native citizenship and became Japanese? There’s a hypothetical worth consideration, especially if you’re spouse and kids are Japanese

      • Blair

        You have the benefit of living in a society that facilitates your making a living. You enjoy the safety and convenience that society provides. You have the option of becoming a citizen in that society if you’d like to be entitled to the benefits of a full citizen. If not, the State is more often then not benevolent when it comes to caring for you as a non-citizen even if you break the contract you’ve made with the State in which you’ve agreed that you must have the requisite means of employment or finances that is a primary condition of your being here. If you are unable to support yourself, then your native country is responsible for your welfare not Japan. Japan is responsible for the welfare of its citizens. The issuing of welfare to non-citizens is benevolent charity and should be appreciated as such

      • Harmony over Melody

        Jonathan, I may be wrong, but it looks like you may have misunderstood that this is about social insurance. It isn’t. It’s about social assistance for people who don’t qualify for social insurance – it’s precisely for people who haven’t paid in for whatever reason. The main recipients are elderly and abandoned mothers. This ruling has no impact at all on social insurance.

        In addition, if you have a spouse visa or permanent residence, you would still qualify for this benefit. That’s the point the article (but sadly, not the headline) is trying to make.

        I agree absolutely with your sentiment that if you live here on a long-term basis you should be afforded social protections regardless of nationality.

      • Jonathan Fields

        Indeed it would appear that I relied too heavily on the headline. But am I wrong that this ruling sets a legal precedent that could potentially affect even those who qualify? I would happy to be wrong in that case as well.

      • Harmony over Melody

        Qualify for social insurance? Zero impact. It’s a different system. End of story. Qualify for social assistance? (Seikatsu hogo) As far as I understand, this ruling sets no precedent at all. It returns matters to how things were before 2012. All municipalities that have been contacted by journalists that I’ve seen (and personal contacts in one municipality) have said this ruling changes nothing at all about administering seikatsu hogo for non-citizens that qualify. They’ll still get it.

        I’ve had a look back and to be picky, I think the article may actually not be correct in stating that only PRs (including SPRs) and spouses are eligible. There was an oral clarification on the meaning of “long-term resident” in 1990, and it included the above, plus refugees (as a result of international treaty obligations), plus “long term residents” (“teijuusha”). I’m not quite sure what teijuusha means. It literally means long term resident, but in law it looks like it might mean someone given exceptional leave to remain for reasons that don’t fit into the normal visa classifications, but who it’s in Japan’s interest to grant residence to. It would be helpful if someone more informed about immigration and visa law could clarify. (I had originally presumed that this meant anyone witha zairyu card, but I don’t now think that’s the case).

        I should also point out that in my previous answer, I forgot one large category of recipients: the disabled. Also, a disproportionate number of elderly recipients are zainichi. Presumably, they weren’t plugged into the regular labour market in disproportionate numbers, reflecting discrimination issue in the postwar period.

      • Jonathan Fields

        Discussing the issue in English where the terms don’t always overlap and the systems are totally different makes it difficult. Great post.

      • Harmony over Melody

        Thank you!

      • tisho

        No, they’re not. The tax money goes to all kinds of stuff, but not for the ”luxury of living in Japan”. If you think foreigners should have to pay for the privilege of living in Japan, perhaps they should put it in big letters and inform people before they even come, let’s see how many people would wanna pay for the ”privilege” of living in that Japan lol. The welfare tax money goes for welfare, for which they are not allowed to receive. So they are made to pay for something they will not receive. I bet if foreigners actually understood this, most of them would rather leave the country, why would anyone be so stupid enough to pay for a service he is not allowed to get? That sounds ridiculous, as it is. Lastly, you Japanophiles along with most Japanese are so delusional and divorced from reality that i seriously have no idea how are you even going to survive the coming decades. According to Gallup int. which conducted a survey in the time period of 5 or more years across the globe, there are less than 5 million people, i think it was 4 or something around that, that express any desire to go to Japan if they could. So, this means that, even if Japan completely opens up its borders for anyone, there will be a maximum number of about 4 million people that would come. 4 million people is literally nothing, that’s like 0 point something of their population. In comparison more than 80% of the people in the world want to move to the US. Perhaps the question in Japan should not be how do we limit the very few confused souls who want to come here, but how do we actually make people want to come here, in the first place.

      • Blair

        As a non-citizen, you pay for the privilege of living in a society that facilitates your making a living. You pay for the security and safety of living in country built and maintained by the Japanese. One of the conditions of your being here (a condition to which you agreed to in your contract with the State) is that you have secure employment or the financial means to support yourself. If you are unable to keep your commitment to the society which you’ve chosen to work because of its prosperity and standard of living, the State more often than not extends assistance to you even though it’s not obligated. That is called benevolent charity for which you should be appreciative. The State is responsible for the welfare of its own citizens. You have the option of making a greater commitment and becoming a citizen or returning to your native country for assistance if you are unable to secure work and are destitute. Your welfare is the responsibility of your native country, not Japan

      • tisho

        Dear lord, you need to examine your head, seriously… Where do i even start with this bucket of lunacy. Like i’ve told you before, you do not pay for the privilege of living in Japan, there is no such tax, if you think there should be, put it with big letters so that everyone can see it, let’s see how many people want to take advantage of that privilege. The tax that you pay already includes paying for the police and infrastructure, like everybody else, because those are services provided by the state, maintained by tax money. Services provided by private institutions are not included in your taxes, they are payed for on the spot. You have no condition or contract with the state, you work for your employer, you enter into a contract with your employer to perform a certain duties in return for money, also called salary. You have no commitment with either the society nor the state, the only commitment you have is with your employer who pays you the money in return for your services. Your economic illiteracy aside, you live in a parallel universe if you think anybody gives a damn about the society he lives in, when the Japanese go to America to work, you think they give a damn about the society? They go there because they are offered a better job, they go to enrich themselves, they enter into a contract with the employer who created the job, and are committed to performing their duties and obligations as stated within the contract for that employer. The whole Japanophileness has really messed up your brain, no offense.

      • Blair

        break your contract with your employer and see how long you are eligible to stay…the contract is with the State vis a vis your employer…It’s called your visa

      • tisho

        That entirely depends on the country’s immigration policy. Immigration policy are the rules the government imposes on all foreigners and employers, and tell them who they can hire and under what condition, and where and how they can work and under what conditions. For libertarians such as myself, this is a massive infringement of civil liberties. Who i decide to trade with is my choice, and the government does not have the right to take away that freedom from me. A job is created by an employer who invests his own money into it. The employer who creates the job should be allowed to conduct his business and hire/fire and trade with whomever he wants to, be it with a person 2 meters away from him, or 2 million miles away on the other side of the planet, that is his own personal freedom. There used to be almost no immigration law in the US for about a hundred years, today the labor laws in the US are very restrictive, but not as restrictive as Japan’s. If Google sees a value in you, they will pay your plane ticket and give you a green card in about a week max. US companies are allowed to do that. I remember that story of that kid from Palestine, who found a bug on Facebook and posted it on Zuckerberg’s wall. Facebook found out who he is and flew him to the US, they gave him a reward and i think a nice job at Facebook, of course accompanied with a green card. Google and all those giant companies will hunt you down even if you live in the Congo jungle and escort your ass with a private plane if they have to back to the US, if you are valuable to them, they realize that productive labor = profit. They could not care less what nationality you are or where you come from, they will give you a green card on the second if you prove to be of value for them. That’s what open borders does, it increases the productivity because it allows labor to move to productive places. You can be the best farmer in the world, but if you are stuck in Antarctica, you’re not going to achieve much no matter how hard you work, if you move to a more fertile and productive place, you can now utilize your productivity, thereby enriching yourself and everybody around you. The world is probably full of Einsteins who are stuck at low productive places, open borders would allow them to move to a place where they can be productive, this is how the US was build through decades of open borders in the 19 and 20th century. So many giant corporations of today were started by poor immigrants who came to the US in a desperate attempt at finding a job, many would start by selling cow milk on the streets or cleaning shoes, eventually they would keep growing and growing, and from that small investment they would build a giant business. This is how free market capitalism works, it provides the freedom for people to pursue their own selfish objectives in life, and in the process they enrich not only themselves by everybody around them.

      • Blair

        Thanks for the warm and fuzzy speech. It’s almost inspiring. However, you know what makes me feel all warm a fuzzy? When I walk into almost any washroom and it’s spotless. You know why that is? It’s because a sense of duty and taking pride in your role on the team is inculcated from the get go here. There is a team mentality that is imbued in the culture. Social cohesion is paramount. The moment I get off a plane in any airport in America, the difference is palpable. The washrooms are filthy. The staff are disinterested and slovenly. Servers address customers with “ya wadayawant”. Everyone besides bug boys and Einsteins drag themselves half-assed and begrudgingly through their days, mewling about what everyone else doesn’t do and what they shouldn’t have to do. American is like 50th in the world in Education in terms of international testing in maths and science. Japan is 2nd in Science, 3rd in literacy and 5th in mathematics. I know where this comes from. It’s discipline. I coach hockey and come from a sports background. Everyone has a role and are responsible for that role. They take their responsibility seriously. The team’s needs come before the individual’s wants. This starts with the family, extends to the classroom, the community, the workplace, the nation. Social cohesion is what Japanese value. There’s enough room with in that concept for innovation. Companies such as Rakuten and UUUM encourage creativity and innovation. There are inroads being made in technological advancements…but not at the cost of social harmony. While Europe descends into social chaos, Japan will endure a generation of economic hardship as it adjusts to the generations before it that produces 5-10 children per family. But it will endure because Japanese put the good of the team first. In a generation the population will level off to a more natural number that reflects the modern family. While cultural and religious strife continue to plague Europe and America, Team Japan will remain harmonious.

      • tisho

        Your main argument is that collectivism is better than individualism, let me try to address some of your points. First of all let me say that Japan spends about double if not more money for infrastructure maintenance than the US, Japan’s public infrastructure spending is the highest in the world. Japan is the size of California.. so that explains a lot, and where does money come from should be obvious, it’s tax payers money. Living under the US military umbrella for more than 5 decades now, allowed Japan to not worry about their military, thus focusing entirely on domestic things, if they had to protect themselves, they would have to allocate a lot of money into the military, and probably will not be able to sustain all that public spending.

        Your views reminds me a lot of myself about 5 years ago, when i couldn’t speak Japanese and didn’t understand the Japanese culture on a native level. Is it fair to assume you don’t speak Japanese on a native level? The reason why i think that is because, there is no team work in Japan, there is group work, and that is a very very different thing. Team work means individuals working together toward a common goal, group work is people following and obeying the orders of their leader. There is a very strong group mentality in Japan, and together with conformity and obedience, those 3 characteristics lies at the center of Japanese culture. There is no social cohesion, there is social coercion. Using force is the only way you can make people do what they naturally don’t want to do. Just like communism, their idea of a fair and utopian society can only be achieved through coercion, as people naturally pursue their own selfish objectives in life. If you think Japanese people like living in a conformist society with strict feudal social norms, you are not talking to people enough. The conformity is the number of reason for suicides among young people in Japan, i follow more than hundred Japanese on my Twitter, and few times i have seen some of them tweeting the following disturbing tweets – ”合わせたくなーーい つらいよー”. Very disturbing yet completely understandable. People don’t want to conform to others anymore, they don’t want to live trying to be liked by others, they don’t want to live for others, they want to live for themselves, and do the things they enjoy doing without worrying they will be excluded from society for not conforming to the group. I can give you dozens of personal stories, and many of them very disturbing so say the least. The only way you can make someone live for somebody else is through coercion, you have to threaten him with something, and the threat in Japan is more than obvious for anyone, it’s called social exclusion. You don’t conform to the group, you get excluded. The nail that sticks gets hammered. You think people love cleaning and maintaining the streets clean? Try removing the guild or the punishment associated with not doing so, and see what happens. Is it something they feel pride in doing, or is it something they feel obligation to the group doing? Are they doing it because they feel they have to, no matter how much they hate it, or is it something they really want to do it? Coercion is the opposite of cohesion. It remind me of the people protesting the foreign agriculture competition, they say the Japanese agriculture products are the best and everybody likes it, well then, what are you afraid of? If its so good, people would naturally chose it over the competitor, they know that the only way to make them buy the Japanese products over the foreign one is through coercion, ban the competition, impose tax, shame everyone who chooses foreign over domestic, personal choice is disregarded. Putting the group over the individual achieves what? Happy individual? There is no such thing as ”good for the society”, there is no ”society”. A society is many individuals each with their own selfish objectives, their own preferences, their own likes and dislikes. This is such a long topic i can’t cover all of it here. Innovation and creativity cannot and has never came out of a group oriented society. You can’t come up with something new if you are taught your whole life to conform and never ”rock the boat”. Doing new things, things others don’t agree with is prohibited, conformity and obedience to the status quo is the only rule. Coming up with something new on itself means you have to create waves, you have to disturb the status quo, you can’t do that in a collective society. Group oriented people are not concerned with change and moving forward, their only goal is to keep the things as they are, maintain the status quo, conform and obey the group as it is. Nothing new has ever came out of Japan. You tell me one thing you think Japan is famous for, and i will tell you where it originates from. Japan is very good at material sciences, anything that requires money and repetitive work, but when it comes to social studies, innovation, creative work, they are extremely backwards society. It is a society that punishes innovation, it does not allow free thinkers to come up with new things that can better the lives of others. There is no social harmony in Japan, there is social coercion on the expense of the individual life. If by social harmony you mean people who live in piece, well then all countries that don’t have a civil war have a social harmony. If you mean a society in which people put up a mask to hide their true feeling and views in order to avoid confrontation, then that’s not a cohesion, that’s not harmony, that’s called fake behavior. By avoiding an argument with someone, you’re not solving the issue, you’re not eradicating the thoughts, you’re just putting them underground and hiding them. There is also the indirect communication. The indirect communication and group decision making, contrary to what many people want to think, is actually designed and used with the purpose of avoiding responsibility. When the individual makes a decision, he is responsible and accountable for it, when the group makes a decision, nobody is accountable if it fails. ”You can’t blame me, i didn’t make that decision. We ALL did!”. Indirect communication is the only way people who live in such a highly restrictive societies can communicate. They are afraid not to say something that could be in their minds offensive, or have a consequences for them. Words play such a big role in Japan. It’s more than its original purpose which is to convey an information, in Japan it shows status and ranking in society, all forms of low self esteem. People with strong group mentality have no self esteem, they have no self-image, their only self-esteem comes from the group. Talking to an adult Japanese is often like talking to a child. ”Could you pass me the salt?” you ask, what he understands is -”hmm, he used the word ”could” as oppose to ”may”, this means that he doesn’t respect me, he used this form of salt as oppose to the other etc. etc. all this overly sensitive, low self esteem behavior forces people to adopt an indirect form of communication. Anyway, i could talk about this for hours, ask me something more specific if you want. I think you should also try communicating more with people, but only in Japanese. I don’t know your story, but i am fairly certain if you have grown up in America, and you enjoy the life in Japan, then it means you don’t speak the language and you have little experience. I am sure you will change your mind as you learn more about the Japanese society and the affects of collectivism.

      • Blair

        Sorry, I appreciate your views but I disagree. I’ve lived here my entire adult life (30 years). I’m fully fluent in Japanese. I have 5 kids (all Japanese), all my friends are Japanese (except for my childhood friends in Canada), I’ve lived in Yokohama, Setagaya ward (Tokyo), Chichibu and now Kushiro. I have my own business ( I run an elite youth ice hockey program…you’re welcome to check out my team’s FB page Japan Samurai AAA hockey club), my wife was a police officer before the arrival of our 3rd child when she became a full time mother. While you may follow a lot of disgruntled Japanese on twitter (disgruntled people who feel like outsiders span the globe…Japan is currently 17th in terms of suicide rate…How about the drug addiction rate. That’s a telling phenomenon of people desperate to escape their miserable lives), there are far more people leading fulfilling lives in their families and communities. I’ve seen it everywhere I’ve been, here. Families taking full part in their children’s piano recitals, soccer clubs, studies and more. There is an emphasis on team and community that you’re either ignoring or missing (perhaps you don’t have children and have little experience of becoming part of your community?)…I’m not going to take the leap and make the same kind of assumptions you’ve taken upon yourself to make. I just wonder if you do have kids how on earth you could have missed the boat on joining the team…

      • tisho

        Well, first of all i should say that i don’t live in Japan. I studied and then worked and lived there for a while, but the negatives were so overwhelmingly more than the positives than i couldn’t waste anymore of my precious time, and mental health for that matter. It’s not just the people i follow on my Twitter, the facts speak for themselves. Japan ranks close the bottom in World Happiness Index, and OECD Life satisfaction index, but you shouldn’t really need those rankings to tell you the plain obvious, perhaps you need to speak with more people of all classes of society. If you live in a small town surrounded by married couples, you probably wouldn’t notice it, but the rest of Japan is different story, in particular young people have had enough with this restrictive and controlling society. Just to go OKWave, 知恵袋, Yahoo Japan news, and other popular forums and social networks and see what kind of questions are being asked and discussed. The number one reason for suicides or depression related questions is always conformity to society, and having to deal with controlling people of higher rank. Have you asked yourself, why did your wife prefer a foreigner instead of a Japanese? The reason why so many Japanese girls prefer foreigners is because they are sick and tired of the traditional marriage, and having to sacrifice their own goals in life just to be a housewife to the rest of her life, you say Japanese people treasure this tradition, but are you sure isn’t just the Japanese men? Japan ranks almost at the bottom of gender equality, and the BBC made an article asking if Japan isn’t the worst place on Earth to be a women. You don’t need me explaining you about this, just ask some average girl if she is satisfied with her life and what kind of marriage would she wants to have, an equal one, or the traditional Japanese one. I bet 99 to 1 would say they don’t want the traditional Japanese one. Im not ignoring your argument about the team and community, i addressed it in my previous comment, like i said, there is no team work in Japan, there is no team spirit contrary to what people want to believe, that’s a group work, a group society, and believe me, very few people enjoy it. There are all sorts of duties and obligations that comes everywhere you go, just buying a house or an apartment is not just buying a house or an apartment, is entering that particular group, and with it, you sign up to all the duties nobody wants to do. Collecting money for all sorts of BS that nobody wants, and everybody is afraid to even ask, because once again, in Japan asking a question is not allowed, you ask a question and they take that to mean you’re not a good member of their group, the possible consequences are exclusion. Just google it if you don’t believe me, i can’t remember the name of that tax money you have to give when you move into a new neighborhood, everybody hates that, but they feel forced to pay it, there is very little community i should say, perhaps in small towns there might be, but in middle-sized or big cities there is non, most people don’t ever greet each other, in collective societies there is very little sympathy and empathy, because people are only concerned with carrying out their duties of the group, they are not concerned with helping other members of the group, much less members of other groups. Another ranking in which Japan ranks almost at the bottom is World Giving index which measure the countries who donate to charities the most, not surprisingly individualistic countries like the US, Australia, Canada, UK, Netherlands etc. rank at the top, collectivist countries all rank at the bottom. Compassion simply does not exist in group oriented people, in only exists in individuals who understand what is like to struggle for your own goals and going through hardships in life, people whose only concern is to strip themselves off responsibility and conform to a group knows no compassion for others. Note that politeness and compassion are two different things. Cool club by the way.

      • Blair

        “World Happiness Index”?! Please don’t make me laugh…I wonder if the people in the slums of Detroit were polled for that one. 99% of Japanese women don’t want a traditional family? It’s clear you know very little of Japanese women. I suggest you take your own advice and talk with a broader range of women and not just disgruntled feminists who make up a minority in this country. I remember my eldest daughter telling me a few years back that her English teacher from America was stunned to find most of the girls in her class said they wanted to be a mother when asked about their future. I was too. I asked my daughter what she wanted to be. She said at first she wants to be a kindergarten teacher, then she wants to get married and have kids of her own. Your perspective is of a foreigner who has lived as an individual in a society you couldn’t fully comprehend…That much is crystal clear. Now, because you’ve lived and studied here (yet never assimilated) you feel you’re an expert on Japanese society and you are comfortable regurgitating the same old diatribe that other ex-pats who were never able to assimilate prattle on about. I’m sure your narrow, outsider perspective will be picked up and passed on into the ether wold of the Internet to be regurgitated ad nauseam, but it doesn’t reflect the real flesh and blood lives of most Japanese, at least not the hundreds of Japanese families and friends I’ve known well over the years.

      • tisho

        I would say the kind of people you’re talking about are minority. You don’t need to get angry at me, i am only stating the facts. The facts are that Japan ranks at the bottom of gender equality, many people say Japan is the worst place to be women. Groping in trains in so normal that people don’t pay attention to it anymore, that’s why they even had to make a women-only train. Reporting a sexual harassment will often be met with ridicule and victim blaming. The majority of women do not want to have a traditional marriage. Women in Japan are treated like cattle, even their politicians say ridiculously misogynist things so often, but Japanese women have grown used to this. Those are the facts, just ask any non-married women in a large city, see what she tells you. There are slums in every city, there are poor people everywhere. In general, Americans have much higher standard of living than the Japanese. Again, don’t get angry at me, the facts speak for themselves, Japan ranks at the bottom of life satisfaction index, and that’s just the tip of the iceberg.

      • Blair

        Rape is the most unreported crime in the US. The Department of Justice estimates that less than 20% of rapes are reported because of the appalling treatment victims get from police. I’ve read how bad the authorities treat victims of rape here in Japan…by expats on JT. I’ve read much more on how that’s true by victims in America. That Japan has women only trains indicates its willingness to do something about it. Not that America doesn’t have an abundance of sexual assault on its transit systems. Your facts are skewed to present Japan as being a particular kind of bad when its not as bad as the country you laud for being better. Yes, there are slums in every city…of America. A lot of them…That the world’s number one economy is 50th in the world in education is appalling and telling. I’m thrilled to be bringing my kids up here in this safe, clean environment that teaches discipline, responsibility and respect, and that’s just the tip of the iceberg. Also, you don’t speak for the majority of Japanese women…

      • Steven Mike1127

        I just read your comment that you posted about a month ago. I am sorry if i am being off topic or something, But i seriously cant help it because what you posted is so preposterous that i have to reply it

        This is the one

        {{{Why would a Korean or Taiwanese go to Japan to look for work, when both Korea and Taiwan have higher gdp per capita and higher wages than Japan? For China, sure, for now, only some really desperate chinese would go to Japan. Vietnamese? Sure, why not. Remind yourself that the number of Japanese workers in China is growing every year}}

        I am sorry dude but are you an IDIOT. Japan GDP per capita is higher than South korea and taiwan. With japan= 32,481 usd South korea= 27,513 usd and taiwan=22,083 usd. If you dont believe me see it for yourself here

        [Delete the *** On the link]

        https://en.wikipedia.o***rg/wiki/List_of_countries_by_GDP_%28nominal%29_per_capita

        Please get the fact straight first before you comment because you only make yourself looks like an IDIOT

        and regarding the desperate chinese. If they are so desperate then why is it that the chinese tourist that came to japan are growing exponentially every year. With way way more chinese tourist came to japan than chinese tourist came to south korea and taiwan “”COMBINED””.

        [Delete the *** On the link]

        http://www.japantimes.co.j***p/news/2015/10/21/national/japans-overseas-tourist-arrivals-surpass-last-year-just-nine-months/#.VtpxwZx97IU

        And this is another of your preposterous comment that i want to reply

        {{{Anyway, the only non-monetary term for a Taiwanese to go to Japan would be university student. }}}

        Let me give you another non-monetary value why foreigner would love to live in japan.

        Its called “CULTURE”. You name it. There is anime, manga, game, temple, shinto, kimono, festival, onsen, and so on so on, its so many i cant mention them all. That is the main reason why foreigner would love to live in Japan, Its not because of monetary value you FU**ING IDIOT . Sure japan is a rich country but that is not the main reason.

        For example people like me who would way way prefer to live in Japan rather than to live in a “NO CULTURE” country such as south korea and china. Sure they do have culture but its worthless as SH*T.

      • tisho

        You’re looking at nominal, which is what your money can buy in other countries, you want to adjust that to the inflation of the country, i.e. what your money can buy in your home country, so you wanna look at the GDP per capita based on purchasing power i.e. PPP. South Korea = $36,528, Taiwan = $43,599. Japan = $38,216.

        Tourism and labor work are two different things. There are more Chinese tourists going to South Korea than to Japan. Overall South Korea has more tourists than Japan, and China is the 4th largest tourist destination in the world.

        Japanese culture is a copy-cat of China, there’s nothing new you can find in Japan. Everything you mentioned originates in China and America. Nobody goes to Japan for ”culture”, if anyone wanna see culture, they go to China. The only people who go to Japan are people like you, clueless Japanophiles who have never been to Japan, and have a twisted view of the country, and pretty much knows nothing about it. Don’t bother me again weeb.

      • Steven Mike1127

        HAHAHAHAHA, using PPP as a measure? Seriously dude how IDIOT can you be. If that is the case then China is the largest economy in the world then?? overtaking the US?? Which i am pretty sure NO ONE would agree to that.

        Even if you are using the PPP as a measure. BASED ON THE DATA that you just gave me. Japan gdp per capita is still higher than south korea. And this is what you SAID

        {{Why would a Korean or Taiwanese go to Japan to look for work, when both Korea and Taiwan have higher gdp per capita and higher wages than Japan? For China, sure, for now, only some really desperate chinese would go to Japan. Vietnamese? Sure, why not. Remind yourself that the number of Japanese workers in China is growing every year}}

        There you are clearly SAID that south korea gdp per capita is higher than japan. And you just contradicting yourself. Now i am really sure that you are indeed an IDIOT. Making a comment only to contradict your own earlier comment.

        {{{There are more Chinese tourists going to South Korea than to Japan}}}????? FALSE FALSE FALSE BIG FALSE

        [Delete the ***]

        http://www***.forbes.co***m/pictures/eglg45hhhhg/no-2-japan/

        http://www***.forbes.co***m/pictures/eglg45hhhhg/no-5-south-korea/

        Didnt i just told you to please get the fact straight first before you comment, Oh my god. You just keep and keep your idiocy running high.

        {{{Overall South Korea has more tourists than Japan}}}?? yeah, maybe right in 2014 but not anymore. In 2015 japan overtake south korea in tourism with a total almost 20 million tourist came to japan.

        {{{Japanese culture is a copy-cat of China, there’s nothing new you can find in Japan}}}????

        Copy cat?? You mean like those CHEAP CHINESE JUNK that CHINA clearly copy from the US and Japan product. Is that what you meant??? I think everybody know who is the copycat here.. you are clearly delusional to think otherwise. So here we go again same old same old strategy. You cant argue with a TRUE FACT and always resort to a FALSE FACT. And no matter what. The fact will always come out and you will be looked again and again like an IDIOT.

        I never came to japan??? How would you know?? are you a psychic??? FYI i have been in Japan, infact i am currently living here and been here for a total of 4 YEARS. And guess what, i like it here. The people are nice, polite and very honest. The crime rate are also very very low in here. I dont need to be afraid of getting robbed in the middle of the night.

        I think it is YOU that never came to japan.

        A clueless Japan hater who have twisted view of the country with basically have NO REAL LIFE beside bad mouthing japan mostly with FALSE FACT just like what you did with me. Yap thats right i just called you HAVE NO LIFE. I mean seriously dude. I saw your disqus profile. Those hundreds and hundreds of comment dedicated ONLY to bad mouthing japan. WOW just WOW, you sir are really need to get a FUC*ing LIFE.

        HAHAHAHAHAHA PEACE OUT

      • Steven Mike1127

        HAHAHAHAHA, using PPP as a measure? Seriously dude how idiot can you be. If that is the case then China is the largest economy in the world then?? overtaking the US?? Which i am pretty sure NO ONE would agree to that.

        Even if you are using the PPP as a measure. BASED ON THE DATA that you just gave me. Japan gdp per capita is still higher than south korea. And this is what you SAID

        {{Why would a Korean or Taiwanese go to Japan to look for work, when both Korea and Taiwan have higher gdp per capita and higher wages than Japan? For China, sure, for now, only some really desperate chinese would go to Japan. Vietnamese? Sure, why not. Remind yourself that the number of Japanese workers in China is growing every year}}

        There you are clearly SAID that south korea gdp per capita is higher than japan. And you just contradicting yourself. Now i am really sure that you are indeed an idiot. Making a comment only to contradict your own earlier comment.

        {{{There are more Chinese tourists going to South Korea than to Japan}}}????? FALSE FALSE FALSE BIG FALSE

        [Delete the ***]

        http://www***.forbes.co***m/pictures/eglg45hhhhg/no-2-japan/

        http://www***.forbes.co***m/pictures/eglg45hhhhg/no-5-south-korea/

        Didnt i just told you to please get the fact straight first before you comment, Oh my god. You just keep and keep your idiocy running high.

        {{{Overall South Korea has more tourists than Japan}}}?? yeah, maybe right in 2014 but not anymore. In 2015 japan overtake south korea in tourism with a total almost 20 million tourist came to japan.

        {{{Japanese culture is a copy-cat of China, there’s nothing new you can find in Japan}}}????

        Copy cat?? You mean like those CHEAP CHINESE JUNK that CHINA clearly copy from the US and Japan product. Is that what you meant??? I think everybody know who is the copycat here.. you are clearly delusional to think otherwise. So here we go again same old same old strategy. You cant argue with a TRUE FACT and always resort to a FALSE FACT. And no matter what. The fact will always come out and you will be looked again and again like an idiot.

        I never came to japan??? How would you know?? are you a psychic??? FYI i have been in Japan, infact i am currently living here and been here for a total of 4 YEARS. And guess what, i like it here. The people are nice, polite and very honest. The crime rate are also very very low in here. I dont need to be afraid of getting robbed in the middle of the night.

        I think it is YOU that never came to japan.

        A clueless Japan hater who have twisted view of the country with basically have NO REAL LIFE beside bad mouthing japan mostly with FALSE FACT just like what you did with me. Yap thats right i just called you HAVE NO LIFE. I mean seriously dude. I saw your disqus profile. Those hundreds and hundreds of comment dedicated ONLY to bad mouthing japan. WOW just WOW, you sir are really need to get a LIFE.

        HAHAHAHAHAHA PEACE OUT

      • Pink Floyd

        One of the best comments i have read on JT.

      • tisho

        Dear lord, you need to examine your head, seriously… Where do i even start with this bucket of lunacy. Like i’ve told you before, you do not pay for the privilege of living in Japan, there is no such tax, if you think there should be, put it with big letters so that everyone can see it, let’s see how many people want to take advantage of that privilege. The tax that you pay already includes paying for the police and infrastructure, like everybody else, because those are services provided by the state, maintained by tax money. Services provided by private institutions are not included in your taxes, they are payed for on the spot. You have no condition or contract with the state, you work for your employer, you enter into a contract with your employer to perform a certain duties in return for money, also called salary. You have no commitment with either the society nor the state, the only commitment you have is with your employer who pays you the money in return for your services. Your economic illiteracy aside, you live in a parallel universe if you think anybody gives a damn about the society he lives in, when the Japanese go to America to work, you think they give a damn about the society? They go there because they are offered a better job, they go to enrich themselves, they enter into a contract with the employer who created the job, and are committed to performing their duties and obligations as stated within the contract for that employer. The whole Japanophileness has really messed up your brain, no offense.

  • Yosemite_Steve

    The legal case is interesting. Okuni san says this was not a decision to deny, however when the JT wrote about this decision, the writer suggested that now local governments are more likely to decide not to allocate any funds for welfare payments for non-Japanese, and also that local right wing citizens and/or right wing politicians would probably try to use this ruling to try to force that change on the local welfare offices run by their local government, to force them to implement a policy of denial to NJ. In other words, this would provide more ammunition for the usual right-wing NJ bashing to gain votes and satisfy xenophobic impulses.

    But I agree with the previous comment and question why the heck the local authorities did not provide police and/or social welfare services to help this lady throw the nasty brother in law out of her house and regain control of the income and assets. Surely it’s the job of the social services and police and the courts if necessary, to deal with the main problem in this case. Why wasn’t that done? If the law rules in Japan, then the right not to be robbed certainly ought to primary and enforced in cases like this. It doesn’t make sense to me that this woman ought to need to have pursued the question of welfare in the first place. Why did the authorities fail to tackle the real problem? Even if the lady herself was too intimidated to defend herself from the brother-in-law, certainly in this kind of case the police and prosecutor are supposed to act, aren’t they? Why they didn’t is a big puzzle to me.

    • Firas Kraïem

      “when the JT wrote about this decision, the writer suggested…” Well, fortunately JT writers are not prescient, and none of the suggested things has happened (except maybe in some isolated cases I have never heard of).

      • Yosemite_Steve

        Not yet. But you never know what’s going to happen in time. Some people will do anything they can to cause trouble, especially some of the xenophobes.

    • Firas Kraïem

      “when the JT wrote about this decision, the writer suggested…” Well, fortunately JT writers are not prescient, and none of the suggested things has happened (except maybe in some isolated cases I have never heard of).

    • JusenkyoGuide

      Um… said bit is far, far beyond the scope of this article. We simply have no information from here about that.

      As for why the WELFARE office didn’t conduct a CRIMINAL investigation on the brother-in-law… because they aren’t the police? Not-my-problem is something that is prevalent the world over in every bureaucracy.

      • Yosemite_Steve

        What’s up with the ATTITUDE? Maybe you don’t read English very well, but I mentioned the police and the courts, the police and prosecutors. I’m quite sure I did not come anywhere near suggesting that the welfare conduct a criminal investigation, only that they ought to be able to look beyond the nose of their faces and try to coordinate services when they encounter a sad story like this. The whole point of social welfare is to look after people who need help!

        Some Japanese bureaucrats are indeed officious and maybe even in general more so that in other places. That said, I would expect some social workers in Japan as elsewhere, to try to ‘go the extra mile’ to try to help clients, including getting the police involved where need be, while others may shrug it off.

        In some ways Japan is quite community minded. Old people getting ripped off in many different ways is a big problem everywhere – families don’t always help and in some cases like this are the very cause of the problem. Society, starting with individuals in official positions, should be doing as much as they can to help old people cope with just this kind of problem: elder abuse by family members. I was hoping that readers would connect the dots for themselves and infer that what I would like the social worker to do is to involve the police in clear cases like this with an old woman being made homeless. Rather than taking this up the courts, the lawyers involved if nobody else, should have had the sense to remedy the situation the best and right way, by first and foremost by defending this old lady from her thieving and abusive b-i-l. Why didn’t ‘the system’ take this up to the high court instead of acting on the root of the problem? It really leaves me shaking my head and wondering. Note that it’s possible that the woman refused to prosecute, however imo the police and the courts should be able to intervene in cases where the injured party is too old and confused to manage even the most basic aspects of their own legal interests.

        So what’s the back story with all that? If somebody is going to the effort the write a monthly piece about this, I’d hope that they would address the elephant in the room. Maybe you don’t like such active readers as myself, but I’ve corresponded with Okuni san and I’ve found her very interested in what readers think, so please get back on sides (I hope you understand what that means).

      • JusenkyoGuide

        Oh, I dunno… this is a column entitled “Labor Pains” it… could be just looking at the issue from one particular aspect, not writing a news column. That’s not close reading, that is unreasonable expectations.

        You simply do not know if it was suggested by anyone that she should go to the police. You do not know if that suggestion was followed and the results, you simply do not know. I do not know either. It was never reported on and to suggest that it is some kind of elephant in the room when the author’s stated purpose was to explain the effect of the court ruling on NJ attempts to gain welfare in Japan. Is it interesting, certainly, but it is very much beyond the scope of the column in question. It’s like demanding that a book who is looking at Japan post WWII spend more than a cursory amount of time covering what Japan did during WWII.

      • Yosemite_Steve

        So if people say ‘wait this doesn’t make sense in the first place because…’, you are the comment police assigned to edit our comments and say we can’t question basic premises? Come on, you can even pass a basic reading comprehension test and you’re throwing rocks? Better you stick to making comments on the article if you have one instead of putting on airs of superiority towards thoughtful posters. That would be true even if you had not misread my first comment and confused yourself so badly.

      • JusenkyoGuide

        Did you see a Moderator badge by my name? I think not. No, but I am more than willing to point out that your nitpicking is directed not only at the wrong tree, but the wrong forest. You, and the post you were replying to, are attempting to spin something out of nothing based on… nothing.

        Now if you want to do that, have fun. Getting upset that you got called on having no actual clothes on however…

      • Yosemite_Steve

        You couldn’t even understand my comment, LOL.

      • http://zi.n.gy/ Kirt Seth Cathey

        JusenkyoGuide >> Take your meds… the little brown bottles in the medicine cabinet.

    • Harmony over Melody

      The writer suggested that there was a possibility that municipal governments might stop payments, but this suggestion was made with no evidence. When asked by journalists, all the municipalities contacted were clear that nothing was going to change. I don’t see why it should, to be honest.

  • lance54

    If kokumin = Japanese only, then the Japanese government cannot compel or force any foreigners to join and pay the Kokumin Nenkin. Because problem might arise when getting your retirement pension in the future if a foreigner’s equal rights are not guaranteed based on the definition. What if you are planning to retire to your home country, could you still get your monthly pension with the same equal benefits as Japanese?

    • Doubting Thomas

      If you’re in Japan long enough to retire you almost certainly are married to a local, have Japanese kids/relatives, or qualify for permanent residency. And if you’re planning to leave, you can get three years worth of nenkin payments back.

      I would bet they screw you out of your pension if you leave permanently after you start getting it, though…

  • Mark Stapp

    What about foreign residents of Japan who are the children of Japanese nationals?Are they categorised as being non-Japanese? The article doesn’t mention them.

    • Blair

      If they haven’t been registered in the family registry by their Japanese parent then they’re considered foreign nationals

    • Blair

      If they haven’t been registered in the family registry by their Japanese parent then they’re considered foreign nationals

  • BoonG

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  • BoonG

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