William Underwood

For William Underwood's latest contributions to The Japan Times, see below:

Wartime labor redress efforts at key juncture

| Aug 24, 2010

Wartime labor redress efforts at key juncture

Sixty-five years since the end of World War II, and one year since the Democratic Party of Japan came to power, redress campaigns for forced labor in wartime Japan are bearing promising fruit and entering a decisive phase. Mitsubishi Heavy Industries (MHI) surprised many ...

WWII labor redress efforts gain traction

| Jul 14, 2009

WWII labor redress efforts gain traction

APOWs at Aso Mining during World War II have captured most of the headlines since Taro Aso became prime minister last fall, but other forced labor redress efforts are gaining momentum that will continue regardless of who becomes Japan’s next leader. American POWs have ...

WWII forced labor issue dogs Aso, Japanese firms

| Oct 28, 2008

WWII forced labor issue dogs Aso, Japanese firms

After evading the issue for more than two years, Taro Aso conceded to foreign reporters on the eve of becoming prime minister that Allied POWs worked at his family’s coal mine in Kyushu during World War II. But Aso’s terse admission fell far short ...

Remains issue clouds Tokyo-Seoul ties

| Mar 4, 2008

Remains issue clouds Tokyo-Seoul ties

Historical issues involving Japan and South Korea have entered a new phase with the inauguration in Seoul last week of a conservative president and the return to South Korea last January of the remains of 101 Koreans who died while forcibly serving in the ...

The war according to Aso Co.

| Jun 26, 2007

The war according to Aso Co.

‘Japan the Tremendous,’ the new book by Foreign Minister Taro Aso, highlights the peaceful nature of postwar Japan and calls the country a “fount of moral lessons” for Asia. It might even help Aso become Japan’s next prime minister. But a 1975 book called ...

Aso Mining's POW labor: the evidence

| May 29, 2007

Aso Mining's POW labor: the evidence

One year after media reports that Aso Mining used 300 Allied prisoners of war for forced labor in 1945, Foreign Minister Taro Aso is refusing to confirm that POWs dug coal for his family’s firm — and even challenging reporters to produce evidence. That ...