Stephen L. Carter

For Stephen L. Carter's latest contributions to The Japan Times, see below:

America's problem? Too many laws

Dec 5, 2014

America's problem? Too many laws

A Yale law professor tells his students that it is unavoidable that there will be situations where police err on the side of too much violence rather than too little. But fewer laws would mean fewer opportunities for official violence to get out of ...

Steppe nomads were precursors to the Islamic State

Aug 31, 2014

Steppe nomads were precursors to the Islamic State

The debate over how to think about the Islamic State group has mainly centered on important but abstruse questions — is it evil or not? — and on what combination of military and economic pressure might be necessary to prevent the establishment of a ...

Jun 16, 2014

The blame for Iraq can wait

American efforts to assign immediate blame for Iraq's unraveling carry with them a whiff of the can't-do spirit — as if, unsure how to proceed in the world, we turn on each other instead.

May 15, 2014

Wrong analogy for Ukraine

This month's 65th anniversary of the successful conclusion of the Berlin Airlift has provided supporters of a tougher U.S. line on Ukraine a useful but wrong analogy.

Apr 7, 2014

Voters do not deserve blame for low turnout

There was a time in America when political activitists used to say that a candidate whose main strategy was to talk about how rotten the other side was wasn't worth a vote. Can the today's voters who share that sentiment be blamed for not ...

Mar 18, 2014

West has the moral authority to criticize Putin

Vladimir Putin, like Nikita Khrushchev in the 1950s, is a hard-eyed realist, more than willing to trade an evanescent moral authority for the reality of actual authority. His bet is that the West is made of words when it comes to its criticism of ...

Feb 17, 2014

Waging cyberwarfare by the rules

The news that a highly sophisticated malware program called Mask has spent the last six years stealing valuable intelligence from supposedly secure government and diplomatic computers around the world prompts the question: At what point does a cyberattack become an act of war?