Sergei Guriev

For Sergei Guriev's latest contributions to The Japan Times, see below:

Mar 17, 2014

Economic stakes for Putin

Regardless of the West's response to the Crimean crisis, the economic damage to Russia will be vast. First, there are the direct costs of military operations and of supporting the Crimean regime. Then there are the costs related to the impact of sanctions on ...

Jan 9, 2012

Russia's inevitable democratization

Twenty years ago, Soviet President Mikhail Gorbachev resigned, the Soviet Union ended, and Russia began an imperfect transition to democratic capitalism — a transition that has proven to be far more difficult than expected. Yet, the recent protests — somewhat similar to those that ...

Apr 14, 2011

Medvedev's purge of the Kremlin chairmen

MOSCOW — In recent days, Russian President Dmitry Medvedev has moved against some of the most powerful men in the Kremlin, including Igor Sechin, a deputy prime minister who is perhaps the closest figure to Prime Minister Vladimir Putin — and who is also ...

Feb 26, 2011

Conscripted prisoners of the Russian Army

MOSCOW — Some of the most interesting artifacts of the Soviet Union in Russia are the holidays that continue to be celebrated, almost two decades after the fall of communism. On Feb. 23, Russians celebrated the “Day of the Defender of the Fatherland,” a ...

Aug 4, 2010

That 70s show in Russia

MOSCOW — Can Russia escape the “resource curse” implied by high oil prices, or will it succumb to what we call a “70-80″ scenario? That is the question confronting Russians today, and we fear that their fate will be the latter: If oil prices ...

Feb 5, 2009

Can Russia's economy be saved?

MOSCOW — Russia’s economy is collapsing, but the situation could be worse. The economic crisis has finally forced the government to adopt sensible policies, thereby staving off disaster — at least for now. Official forecasts for Russian gross domestic product growth in 2009 remain ...

Oct 18, 2008

The Russians are coming — loaded with cash

MOSCOW — Russia’s government is sitting on a giant pile of cash that it plans to invest in foreign assets. The glimpse of its economic muscle was revealed when the prime minister of Iceland announced that Russia may come with about $5 billion to ...