Masaru Fujimoto

For Masaru Fujimoto's latest contributions to The Japan Times, see below:

Dec 11, 2005

Discordant history mars neighbors' friendship overtures

Japanese actress Yoshino Kimura was the lone main guest at the Chuo Kokaido Hall in Osaka in October. She appeared without her Korean counterpart in the opening ceremony to celebrate this year’s 40th anniversary of the 1965 Japan-South Korean Treaty that normalized Tokyo-Seoul relations. ...

'The executioner of Tokyo'

Mar 13, 2005

'The executioner of Tokyo'

Gen. Curtis E. LeMay is without doubt one of the most controversial military commanders in U.S. history. Dubbed the “father of the U.S. Strategic Air Command” (SAC) and an icon of the U.S. Air Force, Le May is also known as a belligerent Cold ...

'Scorched and boiled and baked to death'

Mar 13, 2005

'Scorched and boiled and baked to death'

Kayo-chan was in the fifth grade when the Great Tokyo Air Raid took the lives of her parents, her grandparents and two of her brothers — along with some 100,000 other people — as World War II was drawing to its end. She escaped ...

For better or worse

Feb 8, 2004

For better or worse

Exactly 100 years ago this week, Japan embarked on its first war with a major Western power. Though Emperor Meiji’s forces scored a technical knockout the following year, the outcome was to shape Japan’s destiny through to the A-bombs and beyond With the United ...

Treasures too much for one

Aug 10, 2003

Treasures too much for one

For one man alone, the Tokugawa treasures were simply too much to handle. Since Tsunenari Tokugawa, 63, inherited the legacy of the Tokugawa Shogunate on becoming the 18th head of the family in 1963, he has examined thousands of these precious artifacts — from ...

EDO: City spirit of an era

Aug 10, 2003

EDO: City spirit of an era

Whether it’s the floating world of ukiyo-e, the stately rites of sumo, the meticulous craft of netsuke, the minimalist art of Japanese gardens or the decorums of the samurai, what we today regard as the traditional values of Japan took shape in what’s known ...

Prodigy foiled in U.S. quest

Jun 1, 2003

Prodigy foiled in U.S. quest

A U.S. Navy officer was strolling down a deserted street in the town of Shimoda, late on the evening of April 24, 1854, when he ran into two well-dressed young Japanese who handed him a letter in Japanese. The previous month, Commodore Matthew Perry ...

Black Ships of 'shock and awe'

Jun 1, 2003

Black Ships of 'shock and awe'

Whatever Washington would have the world think, many people will only ever believe that the recent U.S. invasion of Iraq was for oil. However, U.S. power diplomacy of the Bush administration’s “neoconservative” type is neither a new phenomenon, nor one confined to the Muslim ...

Shipwrecked Russians lived to tell an epic tale

Jun 1, 2003

Shipwrecked Russians lived to tell an epic tale

With the Crimean War brewing in the eastern Mediterranean between Russia and an alliance of Turkey, Britain and France, a small Russian fleet of four ships commanded by Rear-Admiral Efimi Vasilievich Putiatin sailed into Nagasaki just a few weeks after U.S. Commadore Matthew Perry’s ...

May 4, 2003

Volleys that rang the death knell of an age

Oda Nobunaga is known as the man who dragged Japan out of its blood-soaked medieval past and cleared the way for the 264-year Tokugawa Shogunate to follow. This he achieved by dint of his advanced grasp of military strategy — and especially by being ...