Catherine Pawasarat

For Catherine Pawasarat's latest contributions to The Japan Times, see below:

'Machiya' morphs into IT incubator

Dec 19, 2002

'Machiya' morphs into IT incubator

KYOTO — What do traditional Kyoto and broadband Internet access have in common? Not much, which is the problem. The solution is the Kyoto Nishijin Machiya Studio. This traditional “machiya,” a two-story wooden town house with some 500 sq. meters of floor space as ...

Jewelry 'middle market' slipping away

Feb 19, 2002

Jewelry 'middle market' slipping away

Following the pattern seen in Japan’s clothing and accessories industries, in which ultra-expensive designer bags by Louis Vuitton are snatched up with as much vigor as cheap clothing from Uniqlo stores, the “middle market” is rapidly disappearing from the nation’s gemstone and jewelry industry. ...

Back to nature on Yakushima Island

Feb 19, 2002

Back to nature on Yakushima Island

If you live in urban Japan, probably the only sky you see is sliced up by powerlines; trees grow in tiny parks hemmed in by concrete buildings and polluted expressways. Whatever happened to Japan’s traditional love of nature? You’ll find some of it on ...

Group seeks to close digital gender divide

Jan 17, 2002

Group seeks to close digital gender divide

The old stereotype of the “computer geek” — taped Coke-bottle glasses, pens and protractors in breast pocket — has gotten a series of upgrades over the last decade. The geek has morphed into the “techno-wizard,” complete with a huge salary, power, influence and sometimes ...

Kyogen with a twist

Dec 12, 2001

Kyogen with a twist

KYOTO — What do kyogen, noh, nihon buyo, the works of Samuel Beckett, W.B. Yeats and Woody Allen have in common? They are tools of the trade for the Kyoto-based Noho Theatre group, which is tonight marking its 20th anniversary with “Still Moves,” an ...

Apr 18, 2001

Sensual curves and serendipitous color

KOBE — What do the ancient ceramics center of Shigaraki and suburban New Jersey have in common? Probably nothing, except for ceramics artist Tacy Apostolik. This month, after 14 years of ceramics work in Japan, the New Jerseyite potter Apostolik is having her final ...

Feb 10, 2001

Traditional bamboo basics

The shakuhachi, Japan’s end-blown bamboo flute, is gaining international popularity and few play it better than American-born John Kaizan Neptune. Neptune studied the shakuhachi at the University of Hawaii in the early 1970s, before moving to Kyoto, where he became a master of the ...

Nov 28, 2000

Embracing both past and present, shakuhachi gala blows up a storm

KYOTO — A gala concert by shakuhachi grandmaster Genzan Miyoshi Dec. 3 at the Kyoto Concert Hall promises something for everyone: An array of traditional and modern pieces performed as solos, “hogaku orchestras” and everything in between. Shakuhachi grandmaster Genzan Miyoshi Besides this unusual ...

Nov 5, 2000

Redefining to rescue Kyoto

KYOTO — When people talk about traditional Kyoto culture, all the “a” verbs come out — everyone appreciates it, everyone admires it, many adore it. So why is it disappearing so rapidly? More importantly, can this trend be reversed? Kyoto Mitate International is a ...

Aug 31, 2000

Working together for the future

It’s always your choice to live for today — Raising your voice for all life to remain These lyrics from a song by singer and activist Anja Light sum up the Australian native’s message in her quest to preserve the world’s rain forests. For ...